From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society

By Neil A. Wynn | Go to book overview

4
Organizing for War
Government, Business,
and the Economy

Among the most important of all the changes affecting the American people during the First World War was the growth in size and influence of the national government. So great was this change that the postwar commentator and historian Mark Sullivan could write that of all the effects of the war "by far the most fundamental was our submission to autocracy in government." This view has been echoed repeatedly by other writers, who have described wartime developments in terms of "war socialism," "dictatorial powers," and so on. 1 More recently, however, historians have suggested that, while the war might have brought an "unparalleled expansion of the State," the changes were not quite as dramatic nor as effective as earlier observers had thought. Instead, modifications in government are now seen as haphazard, confused, chaotic, and with little permanent alteration in basic principles or approaches. What emerges instead is a picture of compromise between traditional laissez-faire beliefs and minimal government activity, and an enlarged federal administration following interventionist policies that exceeded anything imagined by Progressives. To some extent, this compromise was "planning without bureaucracy, regulation without coercion, co-operation without dictation," 2 and while it often built upon precedents and ideas of the Progressive era, it also provided a basis for many postwar developments.

Despite the achievements of the Progressives and the increase in the

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From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Sources xi
  • Introduction War, Reform, and Social Change— the First World War in American History xiii
  • Notes xx
  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • 1: The Progressive Era American Society, 1900-1914 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2: From Peace to War 1914-1917 26
  • Notes 38
  • 3: Mobilizing the Population for War Propaganda and Civil Liberties 41
  • Notes 61
  • 4: Organizing for War Government, Business, and the Economy 65
  • Notes 82
  • 5: Labor and the War 86
  • Notes 124
  • 6: War, Women, and the Family 133
  • Notes 163
  • 7: Black Americans and the First World War 170
  • Notes 191
  • 8: The Aftermath of War Reconstruction, Red Scare, and the 1920s 196
  • Notes 221
  • Epilogue from Progressivism to Prosperity: the First World War in Perspective 226
  • Notes 236
  • Bibliography 239
  • Index 257
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