From Liberal to Labour with Women's Suffrage: The Story of Catherine Marshall

By Jo Vellacott | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Biographical Notes
The purpose is to make identifying information available to readers. Short biographies of men have been included, although information on many of these is readily available; this is in the hope that the book will interest a wide range of readers, not necessarily familiar with British malestream political history, who may wish to place the men with whom Catherine Marshall dealt. Wherever available, more extensive information on lesser-known women is given, as well as on the better known, as this is still hard to come by. I have not included people who are only casually mentioned, or those of whom I know very little more than is in the text or notes. I greatly appreciate the help given to me in preparing this appendix by Eleanor Segel. Unless otherwise indicated, sources used are the following (in addition to information gleaned from archival collections cited in the bibliography): Concise Dictionary of National Biography: 1901-1950; Dictionary of National Biography: 1951-1960; A. J.R., ed., Suffrage Annual and Women's Who's Who, 1913; Olive Banks, Biographical Dictionary of British Feminists, vol. 1; M. Stenton and S. Lees, eds., Who's Who of British Members of Parliament; Jennifer S. Uglow , ed., International Dictionary of Women's Biography.
ACLAND, Eleanor, née Cropper (c. 1880?- 1933): from Kendal in the Lake District; had been at St Leonard's School with Catherine; devoted Liberal, m. Francis Acland; tried hard to rouse Liberal women in support of suffrage; founded LWSU in 1913.
ACLAND, Francis ( 1874-1939): Liberal MP for Richmond, Yorks, 1906-10, North-West Cornwall, 1910-22, Tiverton, 1923-24, North Cornwall, 1932‐ 39; various junior ministerial posts, 1908-15; fourteenth Bart, 1926; husband of Eleanor.

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