Thomas Hobbes and the Political Philosophy of Glory

By Gabriella Slomp | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The story is told of the review editor who once asked a distinguished British economist to review a weighty tome of mathematical economics. Having taken the volume in her hands and skimmed through it, after a few seconds the economist turned down the request, claiming that she was not prepared to endure five hundred pages of right-wing twaddle. The review editor could not resist asking how she had reached her verdict (correct, as it turned out) on a highly technical work in such a short time. The economist replied that the author's acknowledgement of the 'help of a deeper sort' by his marvellous wife had given the game away.

This story plunges me into a serious moral dilemma. I am torn between, on the one hand, the duty of acknowledging the help of my life-long companion, Manfredi La Manna, in the production of many ideas in this book as well as the assistance of my son Camillo in the preparation of the index, and on the other hand, the duty of dispelling any illusion in the reader that I might entertain conservative leanings.

Unable to decide which of these duties should be over-riding, I proceed regardless and acknowledge my debt of gratitude to three academics, who, while not agreeing with many (if any) of my ideas, have always encouraged and supported my research on Hobbes, namely, lain Hampsher-Monk, John Horton, and Preston King.

Also, I wish to thank those scholars who, over the years have accepted to comment on my ideas on Hobbes's theory. They include: Brian Barry, Martin Bertman, Keith Dowding, Murray Forsyth, Maurice Goldsmith, Kenneth Minogue, Robert Orr, Carole Pateman, Raia Prokhovnik, John Sanderson, and John Watkins.

Some of the ideas in this book have appeared previously in Political Studies, History of Political Thought and in two joint articles with Manfredi La Manna published in the Canadian Journal of Political Science and in Constitutional Political Economy.

Last and foremost, I wish to acknowledge my gratitude to Tim Farmiloe and Alison Howson of Macmillan Press for their help in bringing this project to fruition.

Gabriella Slomp
St Andrews

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Hobbes and the Political Philosophy of Glory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.