Feminisms of the Belle Epoque: A Historical and Literary Anthology

By Jennifer Waelti-Walters; Steven C. Hause | Go to book overview

NELLY ROUSSEL

The belle époque came to an abrupt end during the summer of 1914. At 3:55 P.M. on August I, Premier René Viviani responded to an international crisis by ordering the mobilization of the French army. A few hours later, German armies invaded Belgium and Luxembourg, following a plan that would bring them within a few kilometers of Paris by early September. French politics changed abruptly. Virtually every political movement in France (including the feminists') swore support for a "sacred union" and vowed not to resume protests until the Germans had been defeated. "Duty," as Marie Bonnevial put it, "called more loudly than rights." 1

The catastrophe of 1914 was an especially severe blow to the French women's suffrage campaign, which had reached its apogee in July 1914. The French Union for Women's Suffrage (UFSF) had enrolled 12,000 members, with branches in seventy-five departments of France. Ferdinand Buisson had delivered a committee report to the Chamber of Deputies in favor of women's suffrage, and over forty percent of the chamber had already announced that they would vote for the bill. A new suffrage organization, the Ligue nationale pour le vote des femmes ( LNVF, the National League for Women's Suffrage), had persuaded many militants to focus on winning the vote. One of the largest newspapers in Europe, Le Journal, with a circulation over one million, sponsored a mock election in Paris in which nearly 506,000 women asked for the right to vote. Finally, on July 5, 1914, more than 5,000 women marched in a suffragist parade honoring the Marquis de Condorcet as a pioneer of women's rights—by far the most French women ever to join a feminist demonstration in the streets. 2

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Feminisms of the Belle Epoque: A Historical and Literary Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Feminisms of the Belle Epoque - A Historical and Literary Anthology *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Editor's Note *
  • Introduction *
  • I the Situation of Women *
  • Nelly Roussel *
  • Countess Pierre Lecointre *
  • Thérèse Pottecher *
  • 2 Education *
  • Marcelle Tinayre *
  • Harlor *
  • Gabrielle Reval *
  • Louise-Marie Compain *
  • Charles Thiébaux *
  • Madeleine Pelletier *
  • 3 Work *
  • Clotilde Dissard *
  • Marie Bonnevial *
  • Louise-Marie Compain *
  • Hélène Brion *
  • 4 Prostitution and the Double Standard *
  • Ghénia Avril De Sainte-Croix *
  • Case Studies of Belle Epoque Prostitutes *
  • Madeleine Pelletier *
  • 5 Marriage and Male-Female Relations *
  • Hubertine Auclert *
  • Léopold Lacour *
  • Louise-Marie Compain *
  • Colette Yver *
  • 6 Issues of Maternity *
  • Marcelle Tinayre *
  • Lucie Delarue-Mardrus *
  • Nelly Roussel *
  • Madeleine Pelletier *
  • 7 Political and Civic Rights *
  • Hubertine Auclert *
  • Nelly Roussel *
  • Appendixes *
  • Appendix One Feminist Periodicals of the Belle Epoque, 1890-1914 *
  • Appendix Two Other Translations of Feminist Writings from the Belle Epoque (following the Outline of This Book and Chronological Order) *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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