Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics

By Mary D. Edsall; Thomas Byrne Edsall | Go to book overview

10
Coded Language:
"Groups," "Taxes," "Big Government,"
and "Special Interests"

THE EMERGENCE of a policy-based, right-of-center presidential majority grew out of the conflation of intensified racial tension, the tax revolt, and one of the most significant developments since the Great Depression—a major economic downturn clearly associated with the Democratic party. Not only was the Depression securely identified with Herbert Hoover's Republican party, but the recessions of the 1950s and early 1970s were tied to the Eisenhower and Nixon-Ford administrations, reinforcing a twentieth-century link between the GOP and periods of high unemployment.

In the late 1970s, the Democratic party was in full command of the federal government and fully empowered to set the public agenda. Organized labor, a major ally of the Democratic party, was firmly entrenched in the nation's steel mills and auto plants. Neither the Democratic party nor the nation's most powerful unions were able, however, to stop the loss of 207,000 jobs in the primary metals industries, the loss of 182,000 jobs in fabricated metals, or of 280,000 jobs making motor vehicles and equipment—a combined total loss between July 1979 and July 1980 of 669,000 jobs in these industries alone. 1

In this context, the recession of 1981-82 was an integral part of a larger industrial and social upheaval—an upheaval accompanied by a decade in the 1970s of unprecedented rates of unemployment, inflation, interest, and taxation—all defying traditional Democratic interpretation or solution.

-198-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Chain Reaction - The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Building a Top-Down Coalition 3
  • 2: A Pivotal Year 32
  • 3: After 1964 47
  • 4: The Nixon Years 74
  • 5: The Conservative Ascendance 99
  • 6: The Tax Revolt 116
  • 7: Race, Rights, and Party Choice 137
  • 8: A Conservative Policy Majority 154
  • 9: The Reagan Attack on Race Liberalism 172
  • 10: Coded Language 198
  • 11: White Suburbs and a Divided Black Community 215
  • 12: The Stakes 256
  • Afterword 289
  • Notes 293
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 333
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.