Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics

By Mary D. Edsall; Thomas Byrne Edsall | Go to book overview

Notes

I Building a Top-Down Coalition
i.
Dan Donohue, interview with author, September 1988, at campaign headquarters of State Senator Robert Raica (R) in Chicago.
2.
" Research Report: Democrats for the 90's," a report on the views of various voter groups by KRC Research and Consulting, of New York, November 1989; " Report on Democratic Defection," a study of working-class white voters in Detroit suburbs, by The Analysis Group, New Haven and Washington, April 15, 1985; and " Strengthening the Democratic Party through Strategic Marketing: Voters and Donors," a 1985 report for the Democratic National Committee, by CRG Research Institute, Washington.
3.
Howard Schuman, Charlotte Steeh, and Lawrence Bobo, Racial Attitudes In America ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1985) 71-138.
4.
"Crime and the Administration of Criminal Justice," in A Common Destiny: Blacks and American Society, ed. Gerald David Jaynes and Robin M. Williams, Jr. ( Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1989), 451-507; and the victimization reports issued by the Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.
5.
Bureau of the Census, Studies in Marriage and the Family, ser. P-23, no. 162 ( Washington, D.C., June 1989); and Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, American Families, 75 Years of Change ( Washington, D.C., March 1990). Cf. additional material cited in Chapters Five and Eight.
6.
James P. Smith and Finis R. Welch, Closing the Gap: Forty Years of Economic Progress for Blacks ( Washington, D.C.: The Rand Corporation, 1986), 12, 13.
7.
There were in 1986 (the most recent year for which racial breakdowns of prison populations are available) eleven times as many state prisoners as there were federal prisoners, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. State prisoners in 1986 were 45.3 percent black; 39.5 percent white; 12.6 percent Hispanic; and 2.5 percent other races. Federal prisoners in 1986 were 65.7 percent white; 31.8 percent black; and 3.5 percent other. (Federal prison statistics include Hispanics as either white or black.) There were, in 1986, 485,951 state prison inmates, and 36,531 federal prison inmates. Therefore, combining the numbers of state and federal prison inmates, there were more black than white prison inmates. The proportion of minority inmates, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is growing.

Figures are from unpublished data from the Survey of Inmates of State Correctional Facilities, 1986, supplied by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Department of Justice, by telephone October I, 1990; and from the Federal Bureau of Prisons, U.S. Department of Justice, supplied by telephone October I, 1990.

8.
In 1988, 39.8 percent of all Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients were black, 38.8 percent were white, 15.7 percent were Hispanic, and the remaining 5.7 percent were of other races, according to "Characteristics and Financial Circumstances of

-293-

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Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Chain Reaction - The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Building a Top-Down Coalition 3
  • 2: A Pivotal Year 32
  • 3: After 1964 47
  • 4: The Nixon Years 74
  • 5: The Conservative Ascendance 99
  • 6: The Tax Revolt 116
  • 7: Race, Rights, and Party Choice 137
  • 8: A Conservative Policy Majority 154
  • 9: The Reagan Attack on Race Liberalism 172
  • 10: Coded Language 198
  • 11: White Suburbs and a Divided Black Community 215
  • 12: The Stakes 256
  • Afterword 289
  • Notes 293
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 333
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