CHAPTER 5
Conclusion

We have found that Frege's philosophy is characterized by an ambiguous, rather unstable position in relation to various possibilities. In metaphysics, it is drawn between a Platonic (and common‐ sensical) realism and a sort of Kantian idealism. In theory of meaning, it occupies an unstable position between a semantic theory (which attaches senses and references to signs) and a semicontextual, cognitivist, epistemological theory (which makes senses and references functions of contexts, intentions, and cognitive perspectives). Its theory of sense also cannot decide between the context principle and the principle of composition: the primacy of the whole sense from which part-senses are abstracted and the primacy of the part-senses out of which the whole sense is to be built up. Its philosophy of mind has glimpses of the full-fledged concept of intentionality, but does not go beyond a logic of intensionality. The mental act is relegated to empirical psychology, and yet the grasping of thoughts, as a mental act, is made to account for the possibility of sense-perception. The concept of sense as a necessary correlate of the act is missed just when it could have been discovered, i.e., in case of frustrated intentions. Likewise in the case of logic: thoughts, truth-values, and assertions all claim priority; in the end logic remains an extensional logic of truth-values. Yet the theorems are formulated in terms of assertions. The act of judging remains external to the thought toward which it is directed. Sentences, thoughts, and referents are correlated, part by part. No

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Husserl and Frege
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy *
  • Husserl and Frege *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 Historical Considerations 1
  • Chapter 2 the Issue of Psychologism 18
  • Chapter 3 Theory of Sense 43
  • Chapter 4 Logic and Theory of Knowledge 87
  • Chapter 5 Conclusion 112
  • Appendix 117
  • Translator's Notes 127
  • Notes 131
  • Index 147
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