The Justices of the United States Supreme Court: Their Lives and Major Opinions - Vol. 2

By Leon Friedman; Fred L. Israel | Go to book overview

Davis' years in the Senate were pleasant ones for him. He enjoyed the power of his independent position and was assiduously courted by both parties. He was respected for his work for the Court and for his association with the martyred Lincoln. He retained a close relationship with Mrs. Lincoln and her son and, at their request, served as administrator of the family estate. Six months before Mrs. Lincoln's death, Davis secured a congressional act granting her $15,000 outright and an annual pension of $5,000. He retired from the Senate after one term in March, 1883, and returned to Bloomington, where he died three years later.

In his contemporary milieu Davis was a prominent figure, but in the light of history, Allan Nevins' judgment that Davis was a man of the "second rank of eminence" probably serves most appropriately.


SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

The largest collection of Davis' personal papers are held by the Chicago Historical Society. Davis' letters are an invaluable source for the politics of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods, but unfortunately they contain little of value for his judicial career. His rare comments about the Supreme Court usually indicated his boredom and dissatisfaction. Willard L. King, Lincoln's Manager: David Davis ( Cambridge, Mass., 1960) is a useful biography that concentrates on Davis' political activities. Stanley I. Kutler, Judicial Power and Reconstruction Politics ( Chicago, 1968), and Charles Fairman, Mr. Justice Miller and the Supreme Court, 1862-1890 ( Cambridge, Mass., 1939), are more complete on Davis' judicial role.

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The Justices of the United States Supreme Court: Their Lives and Major Opinions - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Justices of the United States Supreme Court - Their Lives and Major Opinions *
  • Contents *
  • About the Editors and Contributors vi
  • Peter V. Daniel *
  • Selected Bibliography 406
  • Samuel Nelson *
  • Selected Bibliography 420
  • Levi Woodbury *
  • Selected Bibliography 433
  • Robert C. Grier *
  • Selected Bibliography 445
  • Benjamin R. Curtis *
  • Selected Bibliography 460
  • John A. Campbell *
  • Selected Bibliography 475
  • Nathan Clifford *
  • Selected Bibliography 490
  • Noah H. Swayne *
  • Selected Bibliography 502
  • Samuel Miller *
  • Selected Bibliography 518
  • David Davis *
  • Selected Bibliography 528
  • Stephen J. Field *
  • Selected Bibliography 550
  • Salmon P. Chase *
  • Selected Bibliography 567
  • William Strong *
  • Selected Bibliography 578
  • Joseph P. Bradley *
  • Selected Bibliography 599
  • Ward Hunt *
  • Selected Bibliography 609
  • Morrison R. Waite *
  • Selected Bibliography 625
  • John M. Harlan *
  • Selected Bibliography 642
  • William B. Woods *
  • Selected Bibliography 653
  • Stanley Matthews *
  • Selected Bibliography 665
  • Horace Gray *
  • Selected Bibliography 677
  • Samuel Blatchford *
  • Selected Bibliography 692
  • Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar *
  • Selected Bibliography 714
  • Melville W. Fuller *
  • Selected Bibliography 740
  • David J. Brewer *
  • Selected Bibliography 761
  • Henry Billings Brown *
  • Selected Bibliography 773
  • George Shiras, Jr. *
  • Selected Bibliography 790
  • Howell E. Jackson *
  • Selected Bibliography 804
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