Menzies and the 'Great World Struggle': Australia's Cold War 1948-54

By David Lowe | Go to book overview

3
A THIRD WORLD WAR?

A the beginning of March 1951 Menzies returned to Australia from a Commonwealth prime ministers' meeting in London and said that Australia had no more than three years to prepare for a possible war with communist forces. In parliament he added that three years was a liberal estimate. 1 Chifley immediately rejected the idea of an impending war, and the Labor leadership thereafter never accepted Menzies' sense of emergency, even when it acknowledged the gravity of the international situation. 2

Coming on the eve of the long-awaited High Court ruling on the constitutionality of his Communist Party Dissolution Act, Menzies' remarks have been linked by domestically minded historians to his continuing efforts to legitimise his campaign against Australian communists. But 1951 also saw a climax of Australian planning for involvement in an anticipated third world war. At the end of the year, after much agonising and planning, the government finally agreed on a commitment to send the first Australian expeditionary force to the Middle East, in support of British forces, upon the outbreak of war. It was a cabinet decision which reflected both Menzies' conceptuali sation of Australia in the Cold War and also recent developments overseas and in relations with Britain and the United States. Due to a number of circumstances it was a decision which was not communicated to London, but put on ice, and then varied.

The year 1951, which is the focus of this chapter, also saw the climax of Spender's hopes for a Pacific pact with the Americans. The ANZUS Pact was negotiated and signed; and although the Americans' new readiness to tie up different regions of the world in security

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Menzies and the 'Great World Struggle': Australia's Cold War 1948-54
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Abbreviations vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • The Cold War Takes Shape 13
  • The Menzies Government and the World 43
  • A Third World War? 74
  • Communists and Australians 101
  • A National Security State 128
  • The Old and the New 152
  • Conclusion 179
  • Notes 185
  • Select Bibliography 229
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 243

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.