Slavery Agitation in Virginia, 1829-1832

By Theodore Marshall Whitfield | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

MANUSCRIPTS

The unprinted manuscripts used in the preparation of this treatise are found in the archives of the virginia State Library in six large classifications: Colonial Papers, Executive Communications, Executive Papers, the Executive Journal, the Governor;s Letter Book, and Petitions to the General Assembly. Colonial Papers are arranged chronologically with folders for each year. They in turn are preserved in boxes plainly and adequately marked. Executive Communications and executive Papers are respectively communications of the Governor to the to the General Assembly, and papers addressed to him by citizens. Kept in separate files, they too, are arranged chronologically, The Letter Book and the Executive Journal are bound volumes containing copies of letters sent out by the Governor and the minutes of the Governor;s Council. In the first set volumes contain only the business of single years. Unfortunately the Letter Book for the year 1830-31 is lost. Petitions to the General Assembly are easy to use if one knows the approximate dates of those he wishes or the counties in which they originated. Though a few of the prayers are in print, the overwhelming part of these records down through the period treated in this paper are in manuscript.


OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS

Acts Passed at a General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia, I-CLX, CII not known to be extant in print or manuscript [ Earl G. Swem, Bulletin of the Virginia State Library, X, 1079] (Williamsburg and Richmond, Va., 1776-).

Annual Reports of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary with accompanying Documents, [published annually after 1870, until 1866 in the House of Delegates journals but that year published separately for the first time, not until 1870 were they published separately and regularly] ( Richmond, Va., 1870-).

Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, etc., 11 volumes, ed. by William P. Palmer ( Richmond, Va., 1875-93).

Hening, William W., The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia from the first Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619, etc., 13 vols. ( Richmond, Va., 1819-23).

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