The Middle East and the United States: A Historical and Political Reassessment

By David W. Lesch | Go to book overview

Preface to
the Second Edition

Typically, a lot happens in the Middle East in the span of a few years. This has definitely been the case since the first edition of this book was published in 1996; indeed, the first edition was barely able to mention the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in November 1995 before the final draft went off to the publisher. As such, we could only minimally speculate about the repercussions of this tragic event, expressing a certain amount of foreboding for the future of the Arab-Israeli peace process that dampened what had generally been cautious optimism.

Since then we have observed, inter alia, the following: the Hamas bombings in Israel in early 1996; the shutdown of the Israeli-Syrian negotiations; Israel's Operation Grapes of Wrath in Lebanon in April 1996 to root out and punish Hizbullah for lobbing rockets into northern Israel; Likud Party's Benjamin Netanyahu becoming prime minister in the May 1996 election in Israel; the interminable delays and mutual recriminations in the Palestinian-Israeli negotiations over implementation of the Oslo accords, with the subsequent question of what the U.S. role should be to break the deadlock; Saddam Hussein's continued tussles with the United States over the accessibility (or lack thereof) of sites in Iraq to United Nations inspections teams, particularly that which occurred in October 1997 through February 1998, when the Clinton administration seemed perched to militarily intervene in Iraq to enforce compliance with the UN amid growing estrangement from Washington by its erstwhile Gulf war allies in the Middle East and in Europe (and the realization, albeit belated, in Washington of the inextricable link between the Gulf and Arab- Israeli arenas); intensified butchery in Algeria between extremist Islamist groups and what they believe to be an illegitimate government; and continuing economic problems in most countries in the region facing the dilemma of the generally accepted necessity to shake off legacies of public sector domination, an approach, however, that also generates a host of religio- or sociopolitical reactions that could threaten the ruling regimes.

Those contributors who in the first edition wrote on current and/or recent issues have updated their chapters by commenting on what has transpired over the last three years in relation to their topics. The more historically oriented chapters are es-

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Middle East and the United States: A Historical and Political Reassessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.