Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present

By Spencer M. Di Scala | Go to book overview

16
Mussolini’s Italy

Despite serious problems before World War I, the Italian constitutional system evolved in the same direction of the most advanced European countries, making notable progress toward democracy. By the 1850s Piedmontese ministers were responsible to Parliament, and this was also the case after unification, even though the king retained an important voice in governmental affairs. In France, this ministerial responsibility was won definitively only in 1877, although the executive power was much weaker. In addition, the Senate appointed by the king under the 1848 Statuto never had more than gadfly status, in contrast to Britain’s House of Lords, which lost its power only in 1911 but before then hampered the country’s democratic evolution. Unlike Italy, France, and Great Britain, Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Russia failed to develop ministerial responsibility before World War I. Indeed, immediately after the war, Italians probably enjoyed greater civil liberties than the citizens of most European countries and the United States. Indeed, perhaps this situation and the economic and social effects of the war help explain the reaction of 1921-1922 and the rise of fascism. These developments reversed the country’s steady progress toward a parliamentary democracy and greater economic fairness and thus represented a radical departure from the recent past.


Consolidating the Regime

On November 16, 1922, Mussolini asked the Chamber of Deputies for a vote of confidence. This request and the Duce’s creation of a coalition cabinet convinced traditional politicians anxious to ignore reality that the March on Rome signified only the installation of a cabinet capable of restoring order, which they could vote out of office any time they wished. But while right-wing Liberals such as Salandra saw Mussolini as heading a restoration government, and left Liberal leaders advocated patience until Fascist mistakes encouraged parliament to vote against Mussolini and recall Giolitti, the Duce presented the March on

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 426

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.