Current Issues in U.S. Environmental Policy

By A. Myrick Freeman; Paul R. Portney | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Investment, Inflation, Unemployment, and the Environment

ROBERT H. HAVEMAN and V. KERRY SMITH

IN RECENT YEARS we have been bombarded with conflicting assertions about the incompatibility of environmental quality with other important goals. On the one hand, opponents of the environmental movement argue that stiff controls will be inflationary, will impede economic growth, will deprive firms of needed productive investment, will lead to plant closures, and will cause a loss of jobs. On the other hand, increasing numbers of environmentalists have argued that it is possible simultaneously to create jobs, conserve energy and nonrenewable resources, and protect the environment.1

____________________
1
One such group Environmentalists for Full Employment publishes a newsletter in an effort to form a coalition between workers and environmentalists to attain these goals. In their first newsletter, which appeared in November 1975, they state their goals as:
A. Modern technologies that are excessively capital intensive and energy wasteful simultaneously destroy the environment, deplete resources, and cause structural unemployment. These problems must be attacked concurrently, and such technologies must be rejected.
B. U.S. economic history is a parade of innovations using more and more capital, energy, and resources. In a world of increasing population and diminishing resources, it is more efficient to fully employ human resources while conserving capital and natural resources. But most economic analysts have not yet grasped this new reality.
C. U.S. policy makers have consistently failed to internalize all the costs of our economic system--including pollution, unemployment, and other social costs--in their economic procedures. We must follow the principles

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Current Issues in U.S. Environmental Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.