The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North

By Jack London; Charles N. Watson | Go to book overview

THE LEAGUE OF THE OLD MEN

At the Barracks a man was being tried for his life. He was an old man, a native from the Whitefish River, which empties into the Yukon below Lake Le Barge. All Dawson was wrought up over the affair, and likewise the Yukon-dwellers for a thousand miles up and down. It has been the custom of the land-robbing and sea-robbing Anglo-Saxon to give the law to conquered peoples, and ofttimes this law is harsh. But in the case of Imber the law for once seemed inadequate and weak. In the mathematical nature of things, equity did not reside in the punishment to be accorded him. The punishment was a foregone conclusion, there could be no doubt of that; and though it was capital, Imber had but one life, while the tale against him was one of scores.

In fact, the blood of so many was upon his hands that the killings attributed to him did not permit of precise enumeration. Smoking a pipe by the trail-side or lounging around the stove, men made rough estimates of the numbers that had perished at his hand. They had been whites, all of them, these poor murdered people, and they had been slain singly, in pairs, and in parties. And so purposeless and wanton had been these killings, that they had long been a mystery to the mounted police, even in the time of the captains, and later, when the creeks realized, and a governor came from the Dominion to make the land pay for its prosperity.

But more mysterious still was the coming of Imber to Dawson to give himself up. It was in the late spring, when the Yukon was growling and writhing under its ice, that the old Indian climbed painfully up the bank from the river trail and stood blinking on the main street. Men who had witnessed his advent, noted that he was weak and tottery, and that he staggered over to a heap of cabin-logs and sat down. He sat there a full day, staring straight before him at the unceasing tide of white men that flooded past. Many a head jerked curiously to the side to meet his stare, and more than one remark was dropped anent the old Siwash with so strange

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The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics the Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North i
  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxviii
  • A Chronology of Jack London xxx
  • The Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North 1
  • The White Silence 3
  • The Son of the Wolf 13
  • The Men of Forty-Mile 29
  • In a Far Country 38
  • To the Man on Trail 55
  • The Priestly Prerogative 64
  • The Wisdom of the Trail 78
  • The Wife of a King 86
  • An Odyssey of the North 102
  • Selected Northland Tales 135
  • Grit of Women 137
  • The Great Interrogation 151
  • The Law of Life 165
  • At the Rainbow's End 172
  • The Story of Jees Uck 182
  • The League of the Old Men 206
  • The Marriage of Lit-Lit 222
  • Love of Life 233
  • The White Man's Way 254
  • Finis 267
  • Like Argus of the Ancient Times 285
  • Explanatory Notes 313
  • A Selection of Oxford World's Classics 323
  • The Oxford World's Classics Website 333
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