The Wares of the Ming Dynasty

By R. L. Hobson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
HSÜAN TÊ (1426-35)

Yung Lo was succeeded by Hung Hsi, whose brief reign ( 1425) is of no account in the history of porcelain. The next Emperor was Hsüan Tsung, who reigned from 1426 to 1435 under the title of Hsüan Tê. Historians have given him a noble character as a statesman and scholar who ruled well and wisely and brought peace and prosperity to his people. These are conditions under which the arts could not but flourish, and it is not surprising that the all-too-short reign of Hsüan Tê is noted for bronzes, lacquer and, above all, for porcelain.

At Ching-tê Chên there was great activity and the number of kilns occupied with the Imperial orders rose to fifty-eight, most of them being outside the walls of the Imperial factory and scattered among the private establishments. The Imperial factory itself was placed under the direction of an officer whose title was Ying-tsao-so ch'êng.

An unusually full description of the ware made at this time is given in the Po wu yao lan. We shall have occasion to quote most of it piecemeal in discussing the various types, and it will be enough to summarise it here, only giving in full those passages which are not otherwise quoted. The first place is given to the stem cups decorated with fish in underglaze red. Next are the blue decorated wares, such as stem cups with dragon- pine and plum designs or with figure-subjects and lotus designs. There were small cinnabar pots, too, and large bowls red as the sun, pickle pots and small pots with basket covers and handles in the form of bamboo joints, all of which things were unknown in ancient times. "Again, there were beautiful objects of a useful kind, all small and cleverly made with finely and accurately drawn designs. The incense vases, trays and dishes were made in large numbers and belong to a common class. The flat-sided jars with basket covers, and the ornamented round pots with flanged mouth for preserving honey, are very beautiful and mostly decorated in colours (wu ts'ai). The white cups which have the character t'an (altar) engraved inside the bowl, are what are known as 'altar cups.' The material for these is refined and the ware thick, and the form beautiful

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wares of the Ming Dynasty
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.