Nevada Politics & Government: Conservatism in an Open Society

By Don W. Driggs; Leonard E. Goodall | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
The Governor and the
Executive Branch

Nevada's governors have exemplified the emphasis on individualism and informality in Nevada politics. They have not been, with few exceptions, political party leaders as much as individuals who have tried to appeal to the average Nevadan as "one of them." This common touch has been evident in Mike O'Callaghan's willingness to throw out the first ball in Little League baseball openers, in Bob Miller's eagerness to participate in charity basketball games, and in Paul Laxalt's and Richard Bryan's mastery at "working the crowd" at various happenings.

Unlike the U.S. president, Nevada's governor must share executive power with other elected executive officials, who, under the state's constitution, are elected directly by the people and thus may be members of the opposite political party. The early state constitutions provided for this multiple executive system as a reaction to the rule of colonial governors; later state constitutions followed this pattern. Nevada's constitution and statutes do provide a framework for a governor with leadership abilities to be a strong chief executive. Certainly in the latter half of the twentieth century, the governor became the focal point for state government and the one who received most of the praise or blame for the general well-being of the state.


QUALIFICATIONS OF THE GOVERNOR

The constitution requires candidates for the offices of governor and lieutenant governor to be at least twenty-five years old and to have resided in the state for the two years preceding the election. The original constitution provided for a four-year term with no limit on the number of terms. In 1970 the

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nevada Politics & Government: Conservatism in an Open Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.