Historical Essays and Reviews

By Mandell Creighton; Louise Creighton | Go to book overview

A MAN OF CULTURE.1

Rimini is a spacious town, with many large piazzas. It lies pleasantly on the bank of the river Marecchia, whose mouth once formed a fine harbour, but the sea has receded and has left its traces on the marshy tract which now separates the town from the coast. The country immediately round Rimini is a plain lying between the sea and the spurs of the Umbrian Appennines, which form a fine background to the fertile fields. Most striking among these hills is the rugged outline of Monte Titano, which shelters the towers of San Marino.

Apart from its pleasant surroundings, Rimini is a town full of varied interest. Its position at the mouth of a river marked it out in the earliest times as an important place. It was an old Umbrian settlement; and under the Romans was a stronghold on the frontier of Italy proper, at the junction of the two great Roman roads—the Via Flaminia and the Via Emilia—which formed the chief lines of communication between Rome and the north. The student of Roman antiquity will find in Rimini two splendid memorials of the early Empire. Augustus began, and Tiberius finished, a massive bridge over the Marecchia at the point of junction of the two great roads. The bridge has withstood even the treacherous changes of

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1
Published in the Magazine of Art. 1882.

-135-

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Historical Essays and Reviews
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Dante. 1
  • Dante. 26
  • Æneas Sylvius Piccolomini, Pope Plus Ii. 55
  • A Schoolmaster of the Renaissance. Vittorino Da Feltre. 107
  • A Man of Culture. 135
  • A Learned Lady of the Sixteenth Century. 151
  • John Wiclif. 173
  • The Italian Bishops of Worcester. 202
  • The Northumbrian Border. 235
  • The Fenland. 266
  • The Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Foundation of Harvard University. 281
  • The Imperial Coronation at Moscow. 297
  • The Renaissance in Italy: the Catholic Reaction. 330
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