A History of French Architecture: From the Reign of Charles VIII till the Death of Mazarin - Vol. 1

By Reginald Theodore Blomfield | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE DU CERCEAU FAMILY

I HAVE already referred to the détente, the check that arrested the development of French art in the last quarter of the sixteenth century. Nothing seemed to prosper in that country after the massacre of St. Bartholomew. The old generation had died out: Goujon first, De l'Orme in 1570, Primaticcio, his life-long rival, in the same year, and Lescot and Bullant in 1578. From that date to the end of the century France was no country for the arts, and in 1588 came the Nemesis of St. Bartholomew. In December of that year the Duc de Guise and his brother the Cardinal were murdered, a fortnight later Catherine de Médicis died bewildered and uncared for at Blois, and in the summer following ( August 1589) the last of the Valois was assassinated by Jacques Clément. The tragedy was in full swing: there could be no place for literature and the arts until it was played to a finish. The arts in France were, in fact, in a state of suspended animation in the last quarter of the sixteenth century. There was neither money nor opportunity for their exercise, and the result was a perceptible slackening in the line of development.

Catherine de Médicis was to some extent responsible. She possessed to an unfortunate degree some of the worst qualities of her family, the habit of intrigue, of interference, of disregard of loyalty and fair dealing. Moreover, she laboured under the disadvantage of a great name. Because the Medici had been munificent and discerning patrons she felt that she too must play her part in the protection of the arts. She was obsessed by the mania for building prevalent in France in the earlier part of the century, and the worst of it was that her taste was extremely bad and extremely obstinate. Having little real insight into the arts, she insisted on interfering at all points in the design of her buildings, overrode the suggestions of her artists, and insisted on their carrying out her ignorant caprices. De l'Orme tells us that Catherine devised the plaques and patches of coloured stones and marbles at the Tuileries. She treated Bullant in much the same way at the Hôtel de Soissons.

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of French Architecture: From the Reign of Charles VIII till the Death of Mazarin - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 169

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.