Franklin D. Roosevelt as Governor of New York

By Bernard Bellush | Go to book overview

VII
A BATTLE ON TWO FRONTS

Within the first year of Roosevelt's governorship, Republican leaders were secretly lamenting his incisive grasp of leadership and excellent sense of timing. Through daily press conferences and radio talks he had kept the public abreast of developments in Albany. In one of his numerous messages to the Governor, Felix Frankfurter commented on this Rooseveltian characteristic when he held.

Nothing surprises this particular observer of national events more than the way public men pass up opportunities made to order for them—they are so scared of the so-called prudences. But you are seizing your opportunities. And so I rejoice deeply over the leadership which you have asserted 'on these basic public questions and the lucid education to which you are subjecting the public. 1

New Yorkers were confronted with another gubernatorial contest in 1930, an election which Roosevelt knew had to be won by a decisive margin in order to strengthen his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination. Would he, during this campaign, continue to subject the public to a lucid education on controversial issues, including Tammany graft and corruption?

Roosevelt never lost interest in the national Democratic organization. Following the party's defeat in 1928, he sought to revive the Democracy for the 1932 presidential contest. This activity kept him in the party limelight and moved increasing numbers of Democrats to hail him as the "next President of the United States." 2

As the effects of tariff wars, contracting foreign markets, and

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Franklin D. Roosevelt as Governor of New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • A New Governor 3
  • Upstairs in Albany" 37
  • Rebellion Behind Bars 58
  • Parity for the Farmer 76
  • Secure Our Savings" 103
  • To Prevent Starvation and Distress" 126
  • A Battle on Two Fronts 150
  • In Quest of Security" 175
  • I Stand Fairly Well with Labor" 191
  • Power Belongs to the People" 208
  • A Reasonable Return" 243
  • Honest Graft" 269
  • In Retrospect 282
  • Notes 287
  • Index 329
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