First with the Most Forrest

By Robert Selph Henry | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
TO NEW FIELDS*
September 21, 1863-November 14, 1863

The Battle of Chickamauga ended in the triumphant and never-to-beforgotten shout raised when the soldiers of the right and the left wings of the Confederate army realized in the late afternoon of Sunday, September twentieth, that they had come together as the jaws of a giant nutcracker against the three-sided position held by Thomas—and that, at last and for the first time in major combat, definite and unmistakable victory had come to the far-marching and hard-fighting Army of Tennessee.

To the soldiers bivouacked that night on the field of Chickamauga, there was no doubt of victory and no question that tomorrow would be a day of pursuit. Not even the elation of victory, however, could erase the evidence all around them of the fearful price at which it had been won—a loss in killed and wounded which averaged, for the whole army, more than one man in three. The battle moon shining through the trees cast interlaced shadows upon ground silvered by the first frost of the year and dotted with bodies in all the grotesque poses in which death can strike.

The field was waterless, except for the scant dry-season supply in the wells and springs of the infrequent farm clearings in the forest, and the wounded suffered from thirst as well as chill. At the hospitals, under flickering lamps hung above kitchen tables, the surgeons were at their bloody work. On the sloping ground beneath the windows of a hospital near which Forrest's men bivouacked that night, the arms and legs amputated during the two days of battle lay in a pile twenty feet wide at the base and a dozen feet high—a sight which shocked at least one of Forrest's young soldiers more than all else he had seen on the field of Chickamauga. 1

Despite the weariness of three days of fighting and three nights of camping on the battlefield—the last two without fires, and with scant food and horse feed—Forrest's men were in the saddle at four o'clock in the morning of Monday, September twenty-first, riding northward toward the gap in Missionary Ridge at Rossville, 2 in pursuit of the retreating enemy.

____________________
*
The field of operations covered in this chapter is shown on the map on page 170.

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
First with the Most Forrest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.