First with the Most Forrest

By Robert Selph Henry | Go to book overview

A NOTE ON GEOGRAPHICAL CHANGES

In the years since 1865 there have been material changes in the geography of the country over which Forrest marched and fought, not only in the growth of towns and cities, and the opening up of highways and railroads, but in the names of places and political subdivisions and in the very shape of the land.

The most profound change, by far, has been the creation by the Tennessee Valley Authority of a series of lakes whose waters have covered, or soon will cover, the scenes of most of Forrest's exploits along and across the Tennessce River.

That part of Bedford County, Tennessee, in which Forrest was born and from which he took his middle name, is now Marshall County. That part of Tippah County, Mississippi, to which he removed at the age of thirteen, is now Benton County. The hamlet of Salem, his boyhood home in Mississippi, is no longer in existcnice, its site being known as Old Salem. The nearest town now is Ashland, Mississippi, county seat of Benton County. Chapel Hill, Tennessee, where Forrest was born, is a thriving village, however, marked with an obelisk erected on the site of his birthplace.

Another town which figures in Forrest's operations, Estenaula, Tennessce, once a famous inn and stage crossing of the Hatchie between Memphis and Jackson, Tennessee, is no longer in existence, although the brick foundations of the old inn arc still discoverable. The nearest point is Hatchie Station on the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad.

Several places which figured in Forrest's operations are still in existence but under different names. Brice's Cross Roads is now the post office of Bethany, Lee County, Mississippi. Panola, Mississppi, is now Batesville. La Fayette, Tennessee, is now Rossville. Crawfish Springs is now Chickamauga, Georgia.

Spelling of place names is as they were spelled in the time of the War between the States. Thus Murfreesboro, Tennessee, as it is now spelled, appears herein in its spelling of the sixties as Murfreesborough.

The railroad lines which played so large a part in the operations of Forrest appear under the names by which they were then known. The following table relates them to present-day lines, the 1860 designation being shown in italics:

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