Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

LEXINGTON

Railroad Stations: Union Station, Viaduct and E. Main St., for Louisville & Nashville R.R., and Chesapeake & Ohio Ry.; S. Broadway and Angliana Ave. for Southern Ry.

Bus Station: Union Station, 244 E. Main St. for Greyhound, Fleenor, Nunnelly, Phillips and Cooper Lines.

Airport: Municipal, 6 m. N. on Newtown Pike; chartered planes, no scheduled service.

Buses: Fare 5¢.

Accommodations: Five hotels.

Information Service: Lafayette Hotel, E. Main St. at Union Station Viaduct; Phoenix Hotel, Main and Limestone Sts.; Board of Commerce, Main and Upper Sts.; Bluegrass Auto Club, Esplanade.

Radio Station: WLAP ( 1420 kc.).

Theaters and Motion Picture Houses: Little Theater, Transylvania College and Guignol Theater, University of Kentucky, monthly civic talent plays; six motion picture houses.

Swimming: Municipal Pool, Castlewood City Park, 25¢; Clay's Ferry, 15 m. on US 25; Valley View, 15 m. S. on Tates Creek Rd.; Boonesboro, 25 m. S. via US 25; Joyland Park, 3 m. N. on US 27; Johnson's Mill, 12 m. N. on Newtown Rd. Golf: Picadome, S. Broadway extended, 18 holes, greens fee 50¢ Mon.-Fri., 75¢ Sat.and Sun.

Tennis: Woodland Park, Woodland and High Sts., free; Duncan Park, Limestone and 5th Sts., free; University of Kentucky, Rose St., 10¢ per hour; Castlewood Park, Bryan Station Rd. and Castlewood Drive, free.

Riding: 123rd Kentucky Cavalry Club, Henry Clay Blvd., 75¢ per hour. Lexington Riding School, Tates Creek Pike, 75¢.

Racing: Keeneland, 5 m. W. on US 60, running races (mutuel betting), April and October.

Trots: Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, S. Broadway extended, June and September.

Polo: Iroquois Hunt and Polo Grounds, 6 m. E. on US 60, June through September.

Annual Events: Blessing of Hounds, beginning of hunt season, November, Iroquois Hunt Club; May Day Festivals, University of Kentucky and Transylvania College; Junior League Horse Show (Saddle Horses), latter part of July; Tobacco Carnival; Farm and Home Convention, University of Kentucky, November.

For further information regarding this city, see LEXINGTON
AND THE BLUEGRASS COUNTRY, another of the American
Guide Series, published April 1938 by the city of Lexington, Ky.

LEXINGTON (957 alt., 45,736 pop.), third largest city in Kentucky, lies on a rolling plateau in the heart of the Bluegrass Country. The golden stallion weathervane on the Fayette County Courthouse symbolizes an aristocracy of horses. An early law passed in this county

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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