Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

Tour 3

(Cincinnati, Ohio) -- Newport -- Cynthiana -- Paris -- Lexington -- Nicholasville -- Lancaster -- Somerset -- ( Chattanooga, Tenn.); US 27. Ohio Line to Tennessee Line, 221.4 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed. Cincinnati, New Orleans, and Texas Pacific R.R. parallels route between Eubank and Tennessee Line. All types of accommodations in larger towns; limited elsewhere.

This route crosses rolling hills, fertile Bluegrass lands, and the foothills and mountains of southeastern Kentucky. US 27, bordered by white rail fences or old stone walls, passes fine farms in central Kentucky with their stately old mansions; great stables kept with the tidiness of a Dutch kitchen; sleek horses, purebred cattle, and sheep browsing in blue-tinted fields; and broad acres of waving grain, tobacco, and hemp.


Section a. OHIO LINE to LEXINGTON; 98.3 m. US 27

US 27, the Lookout Mountain Airline, crosses the Ohio Line, 0 m., at Cincinnati, Ohio (see Ohio Tour 26), on the Central Bridge (toll 100 to 750) over the Ohio River.

NEWPORT, 1 m. (512 alt., 29,744 pop.), directly above the confluence of the Licking and Ohio Rivers, is within the Cincinnati metropolitan area. Seen from a distance on winter days when the city is blanketed with Cincinnati's smoke, Newport seems to be a gray lake buoying up church spires and chimneys. Most of the buildings, erected in the days of chimney pots, coal stoves, and open fires, are of brick and are utilitarian in workmanship and design. The town is quiet on weekdays, when so many of its citizens have gone over the river to work in Cincinnati, but on Saturdays farmers from the nearby fertile farm lands come to do their trading or discuss crops and politics.

A young soldier by the name of Hubbard Taylor came here in 1790 with the Kentucky troops from Lexington, on their way to join St. Clair at Fort Washington. When young Taylor saw the lush vegetation here, he went no farther. Acting as agent for his father in Virginia, he bought holdings and roughly planned the town, naming it Newport in honor of Christopher Newport who had come to America in 1607 as commander of the first ship to reach Jamestown.

There is no record of what became of Hubbard; two years later when his brother James came to visit the family holdings, he found

-246-

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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