Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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used as an assignment base until January 7, 1862, when it was captured by Gen. C. F. Smith and his Union forces.

WATER VALLEY, 46.3 m. (351 pop.), contains a canning plant that furnishes employment to a large number of people during the season.

Between Water Valley and the Tennessee Line is the northern border of the South's cotton-growing region.

FULTON, 52.5 m. (357 alt., 3,503 pop.), named for Robert Fulton, consists really of two towns, being on the border line between Kentucky and Tennessee. The Tennessee section, with a population of 2,000, is called South Fulton. Each has its own city government and school system, but the single post office is on the Kentucky side. Three lines of the Illinois Central System converge at Fulton, attracting numbers of people from the North as well as the South. The average monthly payroll of employees in the railroad yards is approximately $40,000. Poultry and milk plants belonging to Swift & Company also provide employment. The city also has a COTTON GIN.

Fulton is at the junction with US 51 (see Tour 10).

US 45-51 crosses the Tennessee Line, 53.4 m., 10.8 miles north of Martin, Tenn. (US 45, see Tenn. Tour 10) and 10.9 miles north of Union City, Tenn. (US 51, see Tenn. Tour 11).


Tour 10

( Cairo, Ill.) -- Wickliffe -- Bardwell -- Clinton -- Fulton -- (Memphis, Tenn.); US 51.

Illinois Line to Tennessee Line, 45 m.

Illinois Central R.R. parallels the route.

Hard-surfaced roadbed.

All types of accommodations in towns; limited elsewhere.

US 51, in crossing the westernmost tip of Kentucky, passes through an area rich in agricultural products and replete with historical associations. Along the roadside are level fields of grassland interspersed with tobacco, corn, and, in the southern extremity, cotton. Back from the highway, extending from the Ohio River to Tennessee, is a chain of attractive small lakes fringed with cypress. Along the high bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River are ancient barrows, remains of stone forts, fortified towns, and a paved canal, last traces of the prehistoric people who preceded the Indians in this region.

US 51 crosses the Illinois Line, 0 m., on the west bank of the Ohio River, almost a mile south of Cairo, Ill. (see Ill. Tour 4), on a bridge

-324-

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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