Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

excellent harbor and is an important shipping point for tobacco. Augusta College, one of the first Methodist schools, was here as early as 1799. When the large forest trees were cleared for the village site in 1792, numerous skeletons and artifacts were found, indicating that this was a prehistoric burial ground.

During the War between the States, Augusta was the scene of a battle between Morgan's cavalry, led by Gen. Basil W. Duke, and Federal Home Guards under Col. Joshua T. Bradford. Many of the Home Guards were Southern sympathizers who had been impressed for service by Colonel Bradford. Since the Home Guards were using the brick houses of the town as garrisons, the fighting took place in the streets. General Duke had to burn many of the buildings to dislodge the Federal troops, who finally surrendered. Two gunboats had been stationed at the landing for the protection of the town, but as soon as General Duke's guns were turned on them, they steamed off upriver. This was a Pyrrhic victory for Duke: the heavy loss in officers and men defeated his original purpose -- to ford the Ohio River below Augusta and march toward Cincinnati.

POWERSVILLE, 75.4 m. (103 pop.), a mere sprinkling of houses, was settled about 1783 by Capt. Philip Buckner, soldier of the Revolutionary War. The GRAVE OF CAPTAIN BUCKNER, near the western limits of the town, has been enclosed with an iron fence.

At WILLOW, 76.1 m. (500 alt., 12 pop.), is a junction with State 22 (see Tour 13).

The route wanders about among hills that fall into gullies; the land stretches away in endless wrinkles to a far horizon.

As the highway goes north, it touches the outer Bluegrass, and at 105.5 m. leads down between hills flanked everywhere by spare, softly molded hills with long slopes. Clumps of trees decorate a landscape green in summer, bleak and brown in winter.

ALEXANDRIA, 109.7 m. (513 alt., 424 pop.) (see Tour 3), is at the junction with US 27 (see Tour 3).


Tour 12

( Cincinnati, Ohio) -- Covington -- Warsaw -- Carrollton -- Louisville; US 42. Ohio Line to Louisville, 106.9 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout. Accommodations of all kinds available; hotels chiefly in cities.

US 42, the down-river route between Cincinnati and Louisville, swings cross-country at Covington and does not meet the Ohio River again until Warsaw is neared. In most places between this point and a short distance beyond Carrollton, highway and river run side by side accompanied by the rolling Kentucky hills with their masses of foliage and, across the river, by the low bottomlands and low hills of Indiana.

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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