Hispanic American Relations with the United States

By William Spence Robertson; David Kinley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
GEOGRAPHIC EXPLORATIONS AND OTHER SCIEN-
TIFIC ACHIEVEMENTS OF A CENTURY

The Wilkes Expedition to the Pacific Ocean and the South Seas-- Lieutenants Herndon and Gibbon cross central South America-Lieutenant Page explores la Plata River System--James Orton descends the Amazon--Agassiz collects specimens in Brazil--His followers--Bailey Willis surveys Patagonia--Haseman journeys through central South America--The Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition explores the River of Doubt--Frank Chapman Investigates Hispanic-American bird life--Squier studies archaeology in Peru--Bingham discovers Machu Picchu--Adolf Bandelier--John L. Stephens visits aboriginal ruins in Central America and Mexico--Hardenburg exposes the Putuymayo atrocities--The discovery of the Yellow Fever stegomyia--The sanitary work against yellow fever--The Rockefeller Foundation fights disease in the American tropics.

The man on the street scarcely appreciates the extent to which Hispanic America has been a field of study for scholars. By governmental action, by the activities of learned institutions, and by the explorations of daring travelers attractive vistas have been opened in that vast region to men of science. The limits of this volume prohibit consideration of all the additions to the world's knowledge concerning Mexico, Central America, and South America which have been made by the citizens or the Government of the United States. Certain scientific achievements, however, may not be omitted or lightly mentioned: among those are expeditions by which contributions have been made to the knowledge of geography and related sciences.

The first exploring expedition that was sent to South America by the United States Government was dispatched under Lieutenant Charles Wilkes. On March 20, 1838, Secretary of the Navy Dickerson placed Wilkes in command of an expedition of six vessels, which, in accordance with an act of Congress dated May 14, 1836, was destined to explore and survey the Pacific Ocean and the South Seas in order to promote the commerce of citizens of the United States engaged in the whale fisheries. This expedition was composed of the sloops of war

-328-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hispanic American Relations with the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.