Preface

HAPPENSTANCE, a prime mover in personal lives as well as in historic events, prompted my decision to write this life of Fidel Castro. A colleague at Indiana University, a Cuban specialist, had left to take a position at another university. His course on the Castro revolution had regularly drawn as many as 150 students each semester, and I was reluctant to see that enrollment lost to the department. I agreed, therefore, to take over the course. At first it was a matter of the blind leading the blind, and I drew shamelessly on the work of others for my lectures, managing to keep one step ahead of the students. Those were heady times, with undergraduates engaging in shouted arguments in the classroom. The leader of a radical Marxist group on the campus insisted, in long speeches, on putting my statements in their "proper perspective." A young woman ended one discussion with "Why don't you just shut up!" And another young woman, who, according to newspaper sources, had bitten a Moroccan policeman's leg at the Rabat airport when he removed her from a plane bound for Algiers, regularly informed me of facts that history had "proved," but that I seemed unaware of. For me it was a satisfying course.

Each year, as I made out a new reading list, however, I noted the lack of a narrative summary of Cuba's recent history. To provide one, from published sources, seemed a worthwhile project for a sabbatical year in 1980. Once launched, I discovered that I could not write that short book, that there were too many unanswered questions, questions that involved the person of Fidel Castro. First and foremost, why he had become a communist. His own explanations appeared contrived. They did not accord

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fidel Castro
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fidel Castro *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • 1: The Making of a Revolutionary *
  • 2: History Will Absolve Me *
  • 3: In Durance Vile *
  • 4: A Stranger in a Strange Land *
  • 5: The Sierra Maestra *
  • 6: The General Strike *
  • 7: The Rebel Victory *
  • 8: Rebels in Power *
  • 9: The Maximum Leader *
  • 10: Foreign Visitors *
  • 11: Cuba Yes! Yankees No! *
  • 12: The Bay of Pigs *
  • 13: A Conversion *
  • 14: The Smell of Burning *
  • 15: In the Land of the Giants *
  • 16: The Informer *
  • 17: The New Man *
  • 18: A Little Heresy *
  • 19: Death in a Small Hut *
  • 20: The Brezhnev-Castro Doctrine *
  • 21: Outside the Game *
  • 22: The F-1 Hybrid *
  • 23: Ten Million Tons *
  • 24: Poets and Prisoners *
  • 25: March of the Empty Pots *
  • 26: The World Traveler *
  • 27: A Door Slammed *
  • 28: Cuba in Africa *
  • 29: A Sea of Difficulties *
  • 30: Behold a Pale Horse *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 898

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.