History of the Santee Sioux: United States Indian Policy on Trial

By Roy W. Meyer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
The European Meets the Sioux

ONE OF THE great historic confrontations between European man and the American Indian occurred in the early spring of 1660. The scene was a "rendezvous" in what is now northwestern Wisconsin or, possibly, eastern Minnesota. The principals were, on the one hand, two French explorers, Pierre Esprit Radisson and Médard Chouart, Sieur des Groseilliers; and on the other, the chiefs and braves of the Santee Sioux. Radisson and Groseilliers had arrived the previous fall at Chequamegon Bay on Lake Superior, and then traveled inland to an Indian village, probably on Lac Court Oreille, near modern Hayward, Wisconsin. After spending a miserable winter of near-starvation, surrounded by a multitude of Indians, many of whom did starve, the explorers revived somewhat with the approach of spring and better hunting.1

When conditions had begun to improve, the Frenchmen were visited by eight ambassadors from the Sioux, each with two wives laden with wild rice, corn, and other grains. The food, offered to the hungry party, was welcome, but, as Radisson remarks somewhat ungraciously, would have been more so " if they had brought it a month or two before" (p. 207). Anticipating the ceremonies at the Feast of the Dead a

____________________
1
Pierre Esprit Radisson, Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson, ed. by Gideon Scull ( New York: Peter Smith, 1943), pp. 201-206.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of the Santee Sioux: United States Indian Policy on Trial
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 472

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.