The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-Three Centuries of Anti-Semitism

By Edward H. Flannery | Go to book overview

7
THE AGE OF THE GHETTO

The epoch-making political, cultural, and religious changes of the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries which led Europe from the medieval into the modern world had little immediate effect on the life of the Jews. The times changed, but their situation did not. The great forces of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the geographical and cultural discoveries, which swept feudalism away, shook the Church, and opened new intellectual paths, seemed to bypass the sons and daughters of the Synagogue, hermetically sealed off from their hostile environment. For the Gentile, the Middle Ages were ended; for the Jew, fixed in the historical process, the old instabilities and vexations endured to the very threshhold of the nineteenth century. A period of prodigious developments for one was for the other a time of wandering, stagnation, and isolation. For Jews, in short, it was the age of the ghetto.


LIFE IN THE GHETTO

The ghetto 1 of course was not entirely new. Jewish quarters had existed in ancient times as creations of Jewish separatism; and even segregation of a legal kind could be found as early as the eleventh century. The latter was imposed—and accepted—as a protection rather than an incarceration. It was sometimes looked on

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-Three Centuries of Anti-Semitism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • A Stimulus Book *
  • The Anguish of the Jews - Twenty-Three Centuries of Antisemitism *
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Ancient World 7
  • 2: The Conflict of the Church and Synagogue 28
  • 3: A Critical Century 47
  • 4: Shifting Fortunes 66
  • 5: The Vale of Tears 90
  • 6: An Oasis and an Ordeal 122
  • 7: The Age of the Ghetto 145
  • 8: The Struggle for Emancipation 160
  • 9: The Racial Myth and Its Consequences 179
  • 10: A War Within a War 196
  • 11: The Final Solution 205
  • 12: Red Antisemitism 230
  • 13: Polite Antisemitism 247
  • 14: The Last Twenty-Five Years 263
  • 15: The Roots of Antisemitism 284
  • Notes 296
  • Index 351
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.