Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990

By Erskine Clarke | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
I.
M. Eugene Sirmans, Colonial South Carolina: A Political History, 1663-1763 ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1966), 232. For the enduring strength of such a perspective on the Carolina low country, see, from the first decade of the twentieth century, Edward McCrady, The History of South Carolina in the Revolution, 1775-1780 ( New York: Macmillan, 1901), 205-06. Almost ninety years later similar perspectives are echoed by Walter J. Fraser Jr. , in Charleston! Charleston! The History of a Southern City ( Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1989). Fraser writes: "The climate, the evolving agricultural society, the institution of slavery, and Anglicanism were shaping in the hearts and minds of Charlestonians a world view different from that of Bostonians, New Yorkers, and Philadelphians. White Charlestonians hungered after pleasure, profits, property, and status" (45). See also Pauline Maier, "Early Revolutionary Leaders in the South and the Problem of Southern Distinctiveness," in Jeffrey J. Crow and Larry E. Tise, eds., The Southern Ex­periexce in the American Revolution ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1978), 14.
2.
See, in addition to n. I above, Don Harrison Doyle, "Urbanization and Southern Culture: Economic Elites in Four New South Cities (Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile): c. 1865-1910," in Orville V. Burton and Robert C. McMath Jr., eds., Toward a New South? Studies in Post-Civil War Southern Communities ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1982), 23, 31; Frederic C. Jaher, "Antebellum Charleston: Anatomy of an Economic Failure," in Orville V. Burton and Robert C. McMath Jr., eds., Class, Conflict, and Consensus: Antebellum Southern Community Studies ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1982), 207-31; Frederic C. Jaher , The Urban Establishment: Upper Strata in Boston, New York, Charleston, Chicago, and Los Angeles ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1982); John P. Radford, "Social Structure and Urban Form: Charleston, 1860-1880," in Walter J. Fraser Jr., and Winfred B. Moore Jr., eds., From the Old South to the New: Essays on the Transitional South ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1981), 81-91; and Don Harrison Doyle, "Leadership and Decline in Postwar Charleston, 1865-1910," in Fraser and Moore, 93-106.
3.
The songs, of course, are from the opera Porgy and Bess by DuBose Heyward and George Gershwin.
4.
Many of the issues surrounding images of low country African Americans in the years following the Civil War and their "accommodation" to white culture are discussed with insight in Edmund L. Drago, Initiative, Paternalism, & Race Relations: Charleston's Avery Normal Institute ( Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1990).
5.
See Peter A. Coclanis, The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920 ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989). In this brilliant new economic history of the low country, Coclanis provides an important context for understanding the place of a Calvinist community in the economic and social fabric of the region. This is especially true when Coclanis speaks of a "considerable enterprise" marking the leadership of the region "rather than entrepreneurial lethargy." See esp. 49-51, 139, 157.
6.
See John Leith, Introduction to the Reformed Tradition: A Way of Being the ChristianCommunity

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