Staging Difference: Cultural Pluralism in American Theatre and Drama

By Marc Maufort | Go to book overview
Walter cannot satisfy Victor, and the price of this is their relationship (17).
5.
Miller stated in a 1983 interview with Stephen Centola, "the older one gets, the more of one's parents one recognizes in oneself. You'd think it would be the opposite, but it isn't" (qtd in Roudane, Conversations355-56).
6.
In Timebends, Miller recollects an experience from his childhood which symbolizes powerfully the centrality in Judaism of the concept of an unbroken male line originating in Jehovah and continuing into the present moment. At an Orthodox service at a synagogue in Harlem, Miller recalls that his great-grandfather "would keep turning my face toward the prayer book and pointing at the letters, which themselves were magical, as I would later learn, and apart from their meaning were lines of an art first inscribed by men who had seen the light of God, letters that led to the center of the earth and outward to the high heavens. Though I knew nothing of all that, it was frightening at times and totally, movingly male. From where I sat, on my great- grandfather's lap, it was all a kind of waking dream; the standing up and then the sitting down and rising and falling of voices passionately flinging an incomprehensible language into the air while with an occasional glance I watched my mother up in the balcony with her eyes on me and [ Miller's brother] Kermit, on my great-grandfather and grandfather and father all in a row" (36-37).
7.
"The Theatre of Guilt," American Theatre21.
8.
Corrigan was the first to note this, in "Introduction"18.
9.
Miller describes Victor in the 1990 interview with Bigsby as "an idealist of sorts. He can't help it, he can't kick it. . . . I wouldn't say he's my representative. I'd say that I wish he would win, but I have my doubts" ( Company148)

Works Cited
Bigsby C. W.E., ed. Arthur Miller and Company: Arthur Miller talks about his work in the company of Actors, Designers, Director, Reviewers and Writers. London: Methuen 1990.
Blidstein Gerald. Honor Thy Father and Mother: Filial Responsibility in Jewish Law and Ethics. New York: Ktav Publishing House, 1975.
Bloom Harold. "Introduction" to Arthur Miller's All My Sons, ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
Brater Enoch. "Ethics and Ethnicity in the Plays of Arthur Miller," in Sarah B. Cohen, ed., From Hester Street to Hollywood: The Jewish-American Stage and Screen. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983.
Brustein Robert. "The Theatre of Guilt." American Theatre 8.12 ( March 1992): 18-21,49.
Corrigan Robert, ed. Arthur Miller: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1968.
Freedman Morris. American Drama in Social Context. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1962.
Gorer Geoffrey. The American People: A Study in National Character, revised

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