Travel Culture: Essays on What Makes Us Go

By Carol Traynor Williams | Go to book overview

About the Contributors
JUDITH ADLER is Associate Professor of Sociology at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Her field is the sociology of art, including in recent years, travel regarded as an art form. Her study of "Youth on the Road: Reflections on the History of Tramping" was published in Annals of Tourism Research ( 1985), and "Travel as Performed Art" appeared in American Journal of Sociology ( 1989).
BEATRIZ BADIKIAN was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and now lives in Chicago. She is the author of Mapmaker, a collection of poetry, as well as Akewa is a Woman, a chapbook of poetry. Badikian teaches literature and writing in Chicago.
MICHAEL BRYSON is an Assistant Professor of General Studies at Roosevelt University in Chicago. Besides travel and exploration, he is interested in American literature and history, interdisciplinary studies of the environment, and the relationship between literature and science.
RUTH CARRINGTON has taught in five countries, including eighteen months ( 1990-1992) in Sri Lanka as a Fulbright lecturer in English at the University of Peradeniya. For her Ph.D. at the University of Maryland she researched the later poems of Marianne Moore. She has published poems, articles, and reviews. Semiretired, she is an adjunct professor at Montana State University-Billings, near her home.
DAVID ESPEY is Director of Freshman English at the University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches courses in modern fiction and expository writing. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in Morocco and has held Fulbright lectureships in Morocco and Turkey.

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Travel Culture: Essays on What Makes Us Go
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.