The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 19

By George P. Rawick | Go to book overview

THE AMERICAN SLAVE: A COMPOSITE AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Series One
Volume 1: From Sundown to Sunup: The Making of the Black Community
Volume 2: South Carolina Narratives, Parts 1 and 2
Volume 3: South Carolina Narratives, Parts 3 and 4
Volume 4: Texas Narratives, Parts 1 and 2
Volume 5: Texas Narratives, Parts 3 and 4
Volume 6: Alabama and Indiana Narratives
Volume 7: Oklahoma and Mississippi Narratives
Series Two
Volume 8: Arkansas Narratives, Parts 1 and 2
Volume 9: Arkansas Narratives, Parts 3 and 4
Volume 10: Arkansas Narratives, Parts 5 and 6
Volume 11: Arkansas Narratives, Part 7, and Missouri Narratives
Volume 12: Georgia Narratives, Parts 1 and 2
Volume 13: Georgia Narratives, Parts 3 and 4
Volume 14: North Carolina Narratives, Part 1
Volume 15: North Carolina Narratives, Part 2
Volume 16: Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and Tennessee Narratives
Volume 17: Florida Narratives
Volume 18: Unwritten History of Slavery (Fisk University)
Volume 19: God Struck Me Dead (Fisk University)

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The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 19
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Introduction i
  • Status, Phantasy, and the Christian Dogma (a Note About the Conversion Experiences of Negro Ex-Slaves) iv
  • Prologue: A Man in a Man 1
  • Prologue: A Man in a Man 1
  • I Am Blessed but You Are Damned 3
  • Hooked in the Heart 7
  • My Jaws Became Unlocked 11
  • God Struck Me Dead 19
  • I Came from Heaven and Now Return 23
  • Split Open from Head to Foot 26
  • You Must Die This Day 28
  • I Came to Myself Shouting 30
  • Fly Open for My Bride 32
  • The Gospel Train 36
  • I Am as Old as God 37
  • I Want You to Jump 39
  • To Hell with a Prayer in My Mouth 41
  • Souls Piled Up like Timber 44
  • The Inside Voice Never Leaves Me Lonely 47
  • Behold the Travail of Your Soul 49
  • Your Sins All Washed Away 53
  • I Ain't Got to Die No More 55
  • Before the Wind Ever Blew 57
  • Golden Slippers on My Feet 58
  • Everything Just Fits 60
  • The Golden Wedge 62
  • A Voice Rang in My Soul 64
  • Waiting for to Carry Me Home 67
  • Angels Warm Me in My Dreams 69
  • I'Ll Do the Separation at the Last Day 71
  • The Sun in a Cloudy Sky 72
  • Pray a Little Harder 73
  • There Ain't No Conjurers 75
  • A Burning Over My Soul 76
  • Felt the Darkness with My Hands 77
  • Jesus Handed Me a Ticket 80
  • I Died to Live Again 83
  • Little Me Looks at Old Dead Me 84
  • The Road So Narrow and My Feet So Big 85
  • Barked at by the Hell-Hounds 86
  • I Looked at My Hands and They Were New 87
  • Behold, I Am a Doctor 89
  • Hinder Me Not Ye Much-Loved Sins 92
  • Waist-Deep in Death 93
  • Baptized in the Spirit 94
  • Sitting on Cattle with a Thousand Hoofs 95
  • The Lord Spoke Peace to My Soul 97
  • More Than Conqueror 98
  • Hewn from the Mountains of Eternity 101
  • Time Brought You to This World 102
  • Epilogue: I Have Seen Nothing and Heard Nothing 103
  • Part II Autobiographies 102
  • Slave Who Joined the Yanks 104
  • Preacher from a "God-Fearing" Plantation 146
  • "Times Got Worse After the War" 175
  • Sixty-Five Years a "Washer and Ironer" 184
  • Stayed with "Her People" After Freedom 190
  • Slavery Was "Hell Without Fires" 204
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