Yearbook of European Law - Vol. 10

By Francis Geoffrey Jacobs | Go to book overview

Although the preface refers generally to Community law, the focus of the material is essentially on EEC legislation. Extracts from the ECSC Treaty-- mainly some of its institutional provisions--are included for comparison with those of the EEC Treaty, the whole of which is covered. Footnotes to the text of the Treaty help to indicate where it has been amended, but the absence of an index to the Treaty provisions themselves will probably be felt. Up-to-date procedural materials include Council Decisions on the delegated powers procedure and that on the Court of First Instance, and the Accession Treaties are omitted except in so far as they amend the EEC Treaty.

On the substantive side, useful inclusions are the Commission practice note on import prohibitions after Cassis, and the public undertakings Directives as recently amended. The collection also contains the Council Directives on mutual recognition of higher education diplomas which have only lately come into effect, but omits the original General Programmes in the area of establishment and services. Another novel heading is that of industrial and intellectual property, given the recent Commission block exemption Regulations for certain franchise and know-how licensing agreements. The only United Kingdom legislative provisions included are the relevant sections of and schedules to the 1972 European Communities Act as amended.

If the size of the print makes it a little difficult to read at times, it does succeed in keeping the book concise and manageable. In all, it is a useful and up-to-date addition to the existing collections of Community law sources.

GRÁINNE DE BÚRCA


Le droit de la Communauté Economique Européenne, edited by M. Waelbroeck, J. V. Louis, D. Vignes, and J. L. Dewost. Volume 13 'La Convention de Lomé' by Giorgio Maganza, Editions de L'Universite de Bruxelles, Brussels 1990, 528 pp + Annexes 387 pp + Index 4 pp.

When the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community was concluded in 1958, six Articles sufficed to deal with the position of the non- European countries and territories which entertained special relations with Belgium, France, Italy, and The Netherlands. The accession of the United Kingdom and Denmark and the fact that the dependent territories reached statehood led to a big increase. While Annex IV of the EEC Treaty contained a list of nineteen territories, the number of Associated States has grown from sixty-six in Lomé III ( 1984) to sixty-eight in Lomé IV ( 1989).

The character of the relationship between the European Community and the States, formerly dependent territories, now joined by outsiders, has also changed drastically. The regime established by the EEC Treaty was imposed unilaterally, however beneficial for dependent territories. From the beginning Lomé I ( 1975) and Lomé II ( 1979), the Association Conventions expressed the strongly felt desire of the Associated States that their

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