Beliefs in Government

By Max Kaase; Kenneth Newton | Go to book overview

SUBJECT INDEX
accountability of government 134, 136, 160
action, political 6, 23, 27, 38, 50, 52, 119, 143, 145, 146
action groups 22, 23
see also direct political action; new social movements
activism, political 52, 170
administration 32
advanced capitalist state, see capitalism
affective dimension 10
affluence 17, 18, 32, 90
age 13, 48, 70, 82, 92, 157, 166
see also older cohorts; young
agenda, political:
and activists and citizens 146
changes in 91, 96
in the future 172
and internationalisation 134
and left-right dimension 133
and political competition 171
and valance politics 137
see also materialism; new political
agenda; old political agenda; postmaterialism
aggregate public opinion 98, 104
alienation:
and end of history 33-4
and end of ideology 32
and European politics 88, 92
and legitimation crisis 23
and mass media 30, 53
and modern society 20, 37-8
and overload 25
see also anomie; cynicism; distrust of government
allegiance, political 60, 72, 135, 148, 151
American politics 15, 25, 32, 95, 109, 138
animal rights 39
anomie 33, 34, 37
anti-party 27, 38, 169
anti-politics 38, 169
apathy 16, 51, 152
arts 80
attitudes, political:
changes in 6, 40, 63, 148-9, 166
towards democracy 20, 36-9
of élites and masses 9
towards international government 13, 14, 97-9, 105, 114-15, 121-4
towards political regimes 60, 168
towards role of government 12
structure of 79-88, 108-12
and unconventional behavior 50, 144-5
and voting studies 11
towards the welfare state 71, 72, 75-6, 78, 91-6
west European patterns 88-9
see also agenda, political; materialism; opinion clusters; postmaterialism
Austria14, 41, 51, 91, 113, 170
authoritarian personality 9
authoritarian regimes 5, 126-7, 139, 143, 145, 171
see also dictatorship; totalitarianism
authoritarianism and the end of history 32, 163
authorities, regime and community 9, 60, 132, 148, 160, 168
authority, political:
delegitimation of 25
of the state 24, 26, 134, 150
traditional and rational-legal 153-4, 163
basic values 114
behaviour, political 6, 43, 49, 50, 63, 144, 145
Belgium51, 61, 102, 116-17
belief system 133

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