A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights

By Carl F. Stychin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to begin by expressing my appreciation to the many activists, politicians, and others who generously granted me interviews for this project. I also want to thank all of those friends (old and new) in the United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa, and Australia, for their support, encouragement, and advice, and especially Shauna Van Praagh and Kate Harrison for finding me places to live in Montreal and Sydney. The institutional support I received from McGill University Faculty of Law while I was a visitor there in 1996 was invaluable in the writing of this book, as was the support of the University of Sydney Faculty of Law, which awarded me a Parsons Fellowship in 1997. The financial support of the British Academy, in the form of a Small Personal Research Grant in 1995, allowed me to travel to South Africa and is gratefully acknowledged.

My former institution, Keele University, has been enormously supportive of this book. I want to thank the Department of Law for granting me a sabbatical semester in 1996 and the university for a Research Award in 1997, both of which allowed me the time to research and write. The Keele University Inter-Library Loan Service has been extremely helpful in gathering materials. Most of all, I want to thank my former colleagues in the Department of Law for creating such a collegial, fun, and supportive place to work. I am convinced that there is no law school quite like it anywhere.

Special thanks are due to those friends and colleagues who read and commented on earlier versions of the manuscript. Kenneth Armstrong generously instructed me on European integration and gave detailed comments on chapter five; Wayne Morgan provided numerous insights on Australia, and critically commented on a draft of chapter six; and Noel Whitty helpfully shared his observations on Irishness and parades, as well as commented on chapter two. Davina Cooper generously read many chapters, and I greatly appreciate the combination of critical insight and encouragement she provided throughout the writing process. I also am enormously

-vii-

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A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Nation's Rights and National Rites 21
  • 3 - Righting Wrongs 52
  • 4 - Queer Nations 89
  • 5 - Eurocentrism 115
  • 6 - Reimagining Australia 145
  • 7 - Concluding Remarks 194
  • Notes 203
  • References 223
  • Index 247
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