The Ethics of Organ Transplants: The Current Debate

By Arthur L. Caplan; Daniel H. Coelho | Go to book overview

17. Join the Club:
A Modest Proposal to Increase
Availability of Donor Organs

Rupert Jarvis


I.

In a health service where rationing has become a fact of life, nowhere is the problem of demand outstripping supply more obvious than in the field of organ transplants. For reasons not entirely obvious, despite the fact that the majority of Britons believe that cadaver donation of organs is both ethically acceptable and practically desirable, still only a minority actually possess donor cards, and even fewer carry them:

a Gallup poll for the British Kidney Patient Association, quoted in The Guardian (9.5.90), found that 73 percent of respondents would agree to their kidneys being used for transplantation, although only 27 percent actually had a donor card and only seven percent were carrying one on them at the time. 1

The problem is not that there are insufficient numbers of organs potentially suitable for transplantation, but that these organs, far from being made available for transplant, are destroyed, leaving those in need of a transplant either to improve their quality of life, as in the case of a kidney transplant, or as a life-saving measure, in the case of a heart transplant still waiting. At one and the same time, the organs necessary to save or immeasurably improve actual, identifiable lives 2 are themselves in existence, and yet people are dying for the want of them: "Organ supply is the major limiting factor in organ transplantation." 3 That is to say, the number of lives saved as a result of transplants

____________________
Originally published in the Journal of Medical Ethics, 1995; 21:199-204. Reprinted by permission of BMJ Publishing Group.

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ethics of Organ Transplants: The Current Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.