6
Medicide:
The Goodness of Planned Death

An Interview with Dr. Jack Kevorkian

In 1990 Jack Kevorkian, M.D., was cleared of first-degree
murder
, a charge that was brought after he helped an
Alzheimer's patient commit suicide. Recently he discussed with

Free Inquiry editor Paul Kurtz his option for the sick or
incapacitated for whom life has become unbearable. His book,

Prescription: Medicide—The Goodness of Planned
Death
, was published in 1991 by Prometheus Books

FREE INQUIRY: Dr. Kevorkian, you've been involved in a number of battles, particularly in the last year, that have received public attention. What is your main interest? What are you trying to get across to the public?

JACK KEVORKIAN: I suppose my main interest is to reinstitute an ethical medical practice, which today is more necessary and more needed than ever, to extract from inevitable human death benefit in the form of life-prolonging maneuvers.

FI: Can you amplify what you mean by "extract benefit from death"?

JK: Death under any circumstances is negative—it's a loss of human life. Today we have death that mandated: There are prisoners and there are termina 'v ill, crippled, or incap, citated people who, for various reasons, kill themselves. To some degree these may be beneficial acts for the individuals, perhaps to their families, or to society in the cas of prisoners. But still, all the benefits put together cannot counterbalance the negativing of the loss of a human life.

FI: Is life cherished in itself?

JK: Yes. This is not a matter of divinity or sanctity, but of empirical existence.

FI: Life is good.

JK: That's beyond argument! Whether any specific individual's life is good or

____________________
From Free Inquiry I I ( Fall 1991): 14-18. © Free Inquiry magazine. Reprinted by permission.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Suicide: Right or Wrong?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.