Ethical Challenges in Managed Care: A Casebook

By Karen Grandstrand Gervais; Reinhard Priester et al. | Go to book overview

20
Health Plan Responsibilities for
Medical Education and Research

CASE STUDY

Parkview Hospital is a 550-bed tertiary care facility in the urban core of a major metropolitan area. Only the University Health Care Center, on the opposite side of downtown, is larger, with 750 beds. Consolidation in the local hospital market during the past decade, including a flurry of mergers, acquisitions, and closures, has left Parkview and University as the metro area's only independent hospitals.

Parkview is one of five teaching hospitals in the state. It has long had a mutually beneficial relationship with University, part of the state's large land-grant university system. Over half of Parkview physicians have clinical appointments at University's medical school. Parkview's physicians often collaborate with University's physicians on clinical research projects, some of which are conducted on-site at Parkview. Each year, Parkview trains approximately seventy-five full-time equivalent residents from a variety of primary and specialty programs at University. In addition, Parkview sponsors its own residency programs in pediatrics, pathology, and obstetrics-gynecology. These three programs combined train an additional fifty-five full-time equivalent residents per year. Parkview's OB-GYN program is the largest in the state and the only such program not located at an academic medical center. By being able to offer teaching and research opportunities, Parkview has been able to recruit and retain top-notch clinicians. Parkview has also used its status as a teaching hospital and its close relationship with University in its marketing efforts to attract patients.

In the past few years, Parkview has felt the same cost pressures that have affected teaching hospitals throughout the United States. In its local health care market, in which managed care is now the dominant model of health care delivery and finance, the hospital's linchpin for survival as a teaching hospital—an adequate supply of patients willing to pay such hospitals' traditionally higher charges—is

-340-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethical Challenges in Managed Care: A Casebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.