Clarence Thomas: A Biography

By Andrew Peyton Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Black Spot on the White Horse

St. John Vianney Minor Seminary, which Clarence Thomas's friends unkindly dubbed "the cemetery," was located on the Isle of Hope. The optimistic name is a misnomer. Like many of the small fingers of the Georgia coast projecting into the Atlantic, the Isle of Hope is really an isthmus that the tides occasionally separate from the mainland. The seminary on this pocket of pine-topped coastline was only a few miles down Skidaway Road from Pin Point.

The Benedictines had established a presence in the area in 1877, erecting a monastery and beginning to serve the needs of newly emancipated blacks along the Atlantic seaboard. Their efforts complemented those of the Franciscan Sisters, who began their mission in Savannah a year later. In the 1950s, the Diocese of Savannah selected the Isle of Hope as the site for a new high-school, or minor, seminary. Throughout the United States, the Catholic Church was embracing the notion that young men considering the priesthood should be segregated during the high-school years into their own little universe, a minor seminary fairly close to home. On the Isle of Hope, a collection of cottages that had housed displaced persons after World War II beckoned for conversion. The minor seminary that blossomed from this refurbishing was named after St. John Vianney, a nineteenth-century French priest who, after canonization, became the patron saint of priests engaged in parish work.

St. John's, as its residents called it, opened its doors to these youngest seminarians in September 1959. The stated "Philosophy of Education" of the institution limned the values that undergirded the course of studies:

Man is made to the image and likeness of God. God has endowed man with a certain nature. The development of this nature belongs to the

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clarence Thomas: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 661

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.