Clarence Thomas: A Biography

By Andrew Peyton Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
One of Us

Brer Fox tried time and time again to catch Brer Rabbit, and he came mighty near catching him, but time and time again Brer Rabbit got away.

By the summer of 1991, time finally had claimed one of the giants of the civil rights movement, Thurgood Marshall. As counsel for the NAACP, Marshall had argued the winning side in Brown v. Board of Education. A little over a decade later, President Lyndon Johnson appointed him to the Supreme Court, making him the first black man to hold a seat there. Even while sitting silently in oral argument, he was an imposing man, with owlish eyes, strong nose and pursed lips that seemed to suggest a continuing disdain for the course of national affairs. Marshall became a reliable liberal on the court, although court insiders noted that as age set in, he became more a fan of daytime television than of grinding out court opinions.

On June 27, Marshall finally deferred to failing health, announcing in a letter that he was resigning from the court. The justice's secretary delivered the letter to the White House at around lunchtime. This set off a commotion and, in short order, a well-coordinated search to find a replacement. That led very quickly to Clarence Thomas.

As Marshall's letter was arriving at the White House, Thomas was shopping with Jamal for some training shoes. He went to his chambers afterward, then left for a late lunch with a former law clerk. Upon returning to the courthouse, one of his clerks informed Thomas of the news: Marshall had announced his retirement; Boyden Gray had called and asked Thomas to attend a meeting at the Justice Department at 4:30 that afternoon.

Thomas arrived at the designated time and, as he recalled, was soon "spirited to the situation room at the Justice Department." It was "a

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clarence Thomas: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 661

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    New feature

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 people have dyslexia, and in an effort to make Questia easier to use for those people, we have added a new choice of font to the Reader. That font is called OpenDyslexic, and has been designed to help with some of the symptoms of dyslexia. For more information on this font, please visit OpenDyslexic.org.

    To use OpenDyslexic, choose it from the Typeface list in Font settings.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.