Clarence Thomas: A Biography

By Andrew Peyton Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE
Life, Liberty, and the Open Road

On February 14, 1999, more than a hundred thousand people cheered and hailed Clarence Thomas, Grand Marshal of the Daytona 500. The raucous tribute came in a lavish event that would have been the envy of Tiberius. This honor was the culmination of his longrunning interest in race cars and the NASCAR racing circuit. Wearing a leather auto racer's jacket with a checkerboard stripe, Thomas waved to the crowd and basked in the thunderous reception and the warmth of a delightful winter's day in Florida. To him were reserved the honors of saying in his grand baritone voice, "Gentlemen, start your engines."

Thomas had learned the mechanics of automobiles from his grandfather. He became fascinated with professional auto racing later in life. One of his most valued possessions was his black Corvette ZR1. On it the ardent individualist had placed a personalized license plate: REZ IPSA, a variation of the legal phrase res ipsa loquitur ("the thing speaks for itself"). His knowledge of NASCAR was substantial and included detailed familiarity with the cars, drivers and tracks around the country. Southern white men were the predominant fans of NASCAR (for this reason, the host of one national sports talk show referred to the sport as "Neckcar"). Thomas told friends that he felt quite comfortable in the company of these fans, calling them "real Americans." Dick Weiler, his old friend from Missouri, said he was delighted to be named grand marshal: "He just thought that was a hoot."

On his speaking tours, Thomas still favored places such as Florida, and relatively obscure educational institutions, most of them in the South and West. An exception to this geographical bias was made for conservative conferences conveniently held in the D.C. area. It was to such an audience that Thomas spoke on February 9, right before his appearance before the throngs of NASCAR enthusiasts to the south.

-557-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clarence Thomas: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 661

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.