New York City Guide: A Comprehensive Guide to the Five Boroughs of the Metropolis: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Richmond

By Federal Writers' Project (N.Y.) | Go to book overview

Middle Queens

LONG ISLAND CITY -- SUNNYSIDE, WOOD
SIDE, AND WINFIELD -- MASPETH -- RIDGE
WOOD -- ELMHURST -- NASSAU HEIGHTS --
FOREST HILLS -- KEW GARDENS -- RICH
MOND HILL AND WOODHAVEN -- JAMAICA --
HOLLIS -- QUEENS VILLAGE -- ST. ALBANS

Area: East River and Newtown Creek on west to the city line on east; from Broadway ( East River to 73d St.), Roosevelt Ave. (73d St. to National Ave.), Corona Ave., and Horace Harding Blvd. south to Liberty Ave. and Linden Blvd. (Sutphin Blvd. to city line).

Principal highways: Queens Blvd. and Jamaica Ave.

Transportation: 8th Ave. (Independent) Queens subway, Queens Plaza to 169th St. stations; BMT Jamaica subway, Eastern Parkway to Sutphin Blvd. stations; Long Island R.R. and bus from Jamaica to Hollis, St. Albans, and Queens Village.

MIDDLE QUEENS contains most of the borough's distinctive features: the great industrial plants of Long Island City, the chain of cemeteries in Maspeth and Ridgewood, the "garden homes" belt from Jackson Heights to Kew Gardens, the subway suburbs in and around Jamaica (the gateway to Long Island); and the peripheral communities adjoining the city line. Site of the first settlements in Queens and now the borough's most developed area, Middle Queens took on its modern aspects in the 1910's with the opening of new or improved transit facilities.

LONG ISLAND CITY, fronting the East River and Newtown Creek around the approach to the Queensboro Bridge, is a labyrinth of industrial plants whose harsh and grimy outlines rise against the soot-laden sky. Within an area of a few square miles, gridironed by elevated lines, railroad yards, and bridge approaches, are gathered about 1,400 factories, producing chiefly spaghetti, candy, sugar, bread, machinery, paint, shoes, cut stone, and furniture. Its bakeries alone turn out about five million loaves weekly; its paint and varnish factories, about ten million gallons a year; its stoneyards handle about 90 per cent of the cut stone and marble

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New York City Guide: A Comprehensive Guide to the Five Boroughs of the Metropolis: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Richmond
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Editorial Staff of the New York City Guide vi
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Maps xi
  • Plan of the Guide xix
  • General Information 3
  • Annual Events 42
  • Manhattan 47
  • Manhattan 49
  • Lower Manhattan 57
  • Middle West Side 144
  • Middle and Upper East Side 182
  • The Harlems 253
  • Upper West Side and Northern Manhattan 271
  • Major Points of Interest 307
  • The Harbor, the Rivers, and Their Islands 408
  • The Harbor and Its Islands 409
  • The Rivers and the River Islands 418
  • Brooklyn 429
  • Brooklyn 431
  • Downtown Brooklyn 440
  • North Brooklyn 455
  • West Brooklyn 463
  • Middle Brooklyn 476
  • East Brooklyn 496
  • The Bronx 507
  • The Bronx 509
  • West Bronx 517
  • Middle Bronx 529
  • East Bronx 542
  • Queens 553
  • Queens 555
  • North Queens 562
  • Middle Queens 574
  • South Queens 587
  • Richmond 595
  • Richmond 597
  • East and South Richmond 603
  • North and West Richmond 617
  • New York World's Fair 1939 625
  • New York World's Fair 1939 627
  • Books About New York 649
  • Index 661
  • Index to New York World's Fair 1939 705
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