Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art: Veinte Siglos de Arte Mexicano

By Museum of Modern Art | Go to book overview

detail. He has also a certain ironic subtlety and a strange pleasure in the macabre, surprising to the foreigner but inherited from the days when the idea of death was a constant concern of both the Indian and the Spaniard.

Mexican popular art reveals a people unusually gifted for self-expression in forms of esthetic significance, and the vitality explains why the plastic arts that were becoming debilitated in cultured environments acquired new vigor and feeling when they drew near to the taste and inspiration of the people.

The Mexican Soul. Visitors to this exhibition will not find it hard to recognize that the Mexican people possess extraordinary genius for plastic invention and formal beauty. It will not be difficult to discover in our arts that the finest works are those with a religious or social conviction. If the visitor has looked at the exhibition carefully he will find that the Mexican, although capable, of imitating reality, uses it for the most part symbolically; that he enjoys the free play of elaborate decoration and conveys messages contained in forms charged with meaning; that he understands monumentality and also takes delight in minuteness; that the rich profusion he loves obeys a secret discipline; that he is delicate even to softness and violent to imprecation; and that in him a profound and ancient sorrow nourishes the flowers of laughter and irony.

For all these contradictions, the serious observer will find in this exhibition eloquent arguments, for these contradictions are at once the essence of our art and the soul of our people.

ANTONIO CASTRO LEAL


INTRODUCCION

L'art mexicain se rapproche de plus en plus de nous au point de determiner dans nos recherches des courants essentiels.

Elie Faure

Por primera vez en la historia de las exposiciones de arte se reúne en un mismo edificio una colección orgónica y representativa del arte mexicano desde las culturas arcaicas hasta las últimas escuelas de pintura. La exposición estd dividida en cuatro secciones. La primera corresponde al arte prehistórico y ha sido formada por el Doctor Alfonso Caso, Director del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, de autoridad internacional en el campo de la arqueología mexicana. La segunda comprende el arte colonial y ha estado a cargo del Profesor Manuel Toussaint, Director del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas de la Universidad Nacional de México, cuyo conocimiento en la materia nadie supera. La tercera comprende las artes populares y ha sido organizada por el distinguido pintor on Roberto Montenegro, que fué Director del primer Museo de Arte Popular fundado

-17-

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Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art: Veinte Siglos de Arte Mexicano
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Corrections 2
  • Veinte Siglos De Arte Mexicano 4
  • Title Page 5
  • Contents Indice 7
  • Committees · Acknowledgments Comites · Reconocimientos 8
  • Foreword of the Mexican Department of Foreign Affairs 10
  • Preliminar De La Secretaria De Relaciones Exteriores De Mexico 10
  • Foreword of the Museum of Modern Art 11
  • Preliminar Del Museo De Arte Moderno 12
  • Introduction 14
  • Introduccion 17
  • Pre-Spanish Art 23
  • Arte Prehispanico 26
  • Colonial Art 67
  • Arte Colonial 71
  • Folk Art 109
  • Arte Popular 111
  • Modern Art 137
  • Arte Modprno 141
  • Brief Biographies 183
  • Datos Biograficos 190
  • Bibliography Bibliografia 197
  • Pre-Spanish Cultures of Mexic0 *
  • Colonial Art in Mexic0 *
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