The Writings of Mao Zedong, 1949-1976 - Vol. 1

By Michael Y. M. Kau; John K. Leung et al. | Go to book overview

have begun to unite as one big friendly and cooperative family that has sufficient strength to defeat any imperialist aggression and to build our homeland into a prosperous and mighty nation. Best wishes for the success of your conference!

(Signed with month and date, no year)


Note
1.
For the linkage among all these movements, see text Oct. 23, 1951, notes 6 and 7.

Telegram to Panchen Gnoertehni
(December 13, 1951)

Source: RMRB ( Dec 15, 1951), 1. Other Chinese Text: XHYB, 2 ( Feb 1952), 52. Available English Translation: SCMP, 237 ( Dec 16-17, 1951), 12.

See text May 24, 1951, source note, and text Nov. 23, 1949, source note. Panchen Gnoertehni, the Panchen Lama of the time, who had been living in exile in Qinghai Province for over twenty years, began his return to Tibet on December 19, 1951. Before he left Qinghai, the Panchen Lama sent a telegram to Mao. For the Chinese text of this telegram, see RMSC ( 1952), pp. 203-204. The Panchen Lama arrived at Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet, on April 28, 1952.

Panchen Gnoertehni, through the

People's Government of Qinghai Province

Dear Sir:

Thank you for your telegram. I fully agree with your wish to unite closely with the Dalai Lama under the leadership of the Communist Party of China and the Central People's Government in order to struggle for the thorough implementation of the Agreement on the Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet, 1 expelling the influence of imperialism in Tibet, consolidating national defense, and building a New Tibet. I wish you a pleasant journey to your destination.

(Signed and dated)

-229-

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