The Writings of Mao Zedong, 1949-1976 - Vol. 1

By Tse-tung Mao; Michael Y. M. Kau et al. | Go to book overview

Democratic Republic, on behalf of the Chinese people, the government of the People's Republic of China, and on my own behalf, I extend my most sincere congratulations to the peace-loving people of all Germany and to you personally.

The Chinese people have followed with great gladness the achievements attained by the German Democratic Republic in the past four years in all areas of politics, economy, and culture. The victories which, with the assistance of the Soviet Union, the German people have attained in the struggle against provocation by international reactionary forces, and the great results obtained in the negotiations between the government of the Soviet Union and the delegation of the government of the German Democratic Republic in Moscow, have made a tremendous contribution to the cause of consolidating peace in Europe and throughout the world.

May the German people attain even greater victories in their glorious cause of striving to establish a unified, independent, democratic, and peace-loving Germany. In this cause, the German people will always have the deep sympathy and complete support of the Chinese people and government. (Signed as Chairman of CPG of PRC, dated, in Beijing)


Speech on Mutual Aid and Cooperativization in Agriculture
(October 15, 1953)

Source: Xuanji, V, pp. 116-119. (First speech.) Available English Translation: SW, V, pp. 131-135.

This is the first of two speeches given to members of the Rural Work Department of the CPC Central Committee before and during the Third Conference on Mutual Aid and Cooperativization in Agriculture, which was convened by the CPC Central Committee from October 26 to November 5, 1953. See also text Nov. 4, 1953.

The two talks presented here represent part of the continuing struggle over agricultural policy and collectivization in the early 1950s. In contrast to the unity the leaders shared on the issue of dealing with the rich peasants during land reform (see text Mar. 12, 1950), Mao here was clearly struggling against others in the Party over the pace of collectivization and the line to be taken toward the rich peasants. His dismissal of the argument that "life is hard in the countryside" as the ruminations of the landlords and the rich peasants for whom life actually was harder than prior to Liberation would be repeated in his more

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