Family Caregivers: Disability, Illness, and Ageing

By Hilary Schofield; Sidney Bloch et al. | Go to book overview

7
CARERS' WELL-BEING:
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN WOMEN
AND MEN, ADULT OFFSPRING,
PARENTS AND SPOUSES

Very few studies compare the experiences of men and women carers and those belonging to different relationship groups. Those that do, tend to divide into two groups: studies focusing on caring for a relative who is aged or has dementia, which may include wives, husbands, daughters and sons, and those focusing on caring for children with disabilities, which are mostly limited to parents. Among the first group, George and Gwyther ( 1986) in the United States in exploring the physical and mental health of those caring for memory- impaired older adults concluded that characteristics of the caregiving situation were more closely related to the carer's well-being than were the characteristics of the care-recipient's illness. They note that the carer-recipient relationship was important and that, even with age differences controlled, compared with adult offspring and more particularly 'other' carers, spouse carers expressed lower physical health, mental health, financial resources and social participation. 1

Among the second group of studies, Beckman ( 1991) compared the perceptions of parents caring for young children with and without disabilities and ranging in age from 18 months to six years. Stress was significantly linked with parenting children with disabilities and lack of informal support. Mothers generally reported more stress than fathers. Romans-Clarkson and colleagues ( 1986), focusing on the mental health of parents of pre-school children, found that mothers of children with physical and mental disabilities had more psychiatric problems than did mothers of healthy children, but fathers in the

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Family Caregivers: Disability, Illness, and Ageing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.