Saint Foucault: Towards a Gay Hagiography

By David M. Halperin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The idea for this little book came to me originally from Paul Foss; to him, first of all, go my thanks and acknowledgments. My work was generously supported by fellowships from the Humanities Research Centre at The Australian National University in Canberra and from the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I am more grateful to these institutions than I can say for what they provided: splendid working conditions, warm hospitality, an immensely stimulating intellectual atmosphere, and superb collegiality; I wish to extend my appreciation particularly to G. W. Clarke, John Ballard, Jill Julius Matthews, Dominick LaCapra, and Jonathan Culler for making these visits possible and for looking after me so handsomely during the course of them.

The impetus to compose the first of these two essays came from a lecture program at Vassar College called "The Philosopher's Holiday." The seriousness, interest, and support demonstrated by the students and faculty during my visit to Vassar in the spring of 1992 provided strong encouragement for me to persevere with this project. The impetus for the second essay came from Jim Miller, whose friendship and generosity have withstood--quite remarkably--the strain of my severe criticisms of his work.

My thinking about Foucault was aided by early discussions with Arnold Davidson, David N. Dobrin, Mark Maslan, Jim Miller, Paul Morrison, and Emery J. Snyder. I also wish to thank Douglas Crimp, Gary Dowsett, Lee Edelman, Didier Eribon, Ann Ferguson, Gary Gutting, Barry Hindess, Morris Kaplan, David Kent, Michael Lucey, Biddy Martin, Ellen Meese, D. A. Miller,

-vii-

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Saint Foucault: Towards a Gay Hagiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Saint Foucault 3
  • The Queer Politics of Michel Foucault 15
  • The Describable Life of Michel Foucault 126
  • Notes 187
  • Index 239
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