A Sailor's Songbag: An American Rebel in an English Prison, 1777-1779

By George Gibson Carey | Go to book overview

Index of Titles and First Lines
All true hearted Britons that passing along, 67
An Alderman liv'd in the City, 124
An American New Song, 110
Answer to Polly's Wish, that the war were all over, The, 150
As by Bedlam I was walking, 132
As I ranged the bowers one evening in May, 142
As I walked forth one Evening fair, 38
As I walked forth to gonnock fair my Self for to Devert, 131
As I walked out one May morning, 40
As I walked out one morning in the spring, 150
As I was in London and Londonfair Street, 69
As I was walking through Francis Street, 128
Baffled Knight, The, 80
Blow the Wind I O, 80
British Highlanders, The, 42
Cease Rood boarous Clustring railer, 84
Cease Rude Boreas, 84
Celia's Complaint for the loss of her Shepherd, 152
Claspt in the arms of her I love, 106
Come all you brave Americans where ever that you be, 120
Come all you faithful rovers, come listen to a merry tail,126
Come all you jolly Heroes let us united be, 110
Come all you young Maidens and take my advice, 112
Come come pretty Sally and set you down by me, 118
Come jolly mortals fill your glasses, 114
Come listen sons of Freedom, 96
Cuckoo's Nest, The, 142
Cupid the Plow Boy, 40
Cupid the pretty Plough Boy, 40
Death and the Lady, 38
Dog and Gun, 107
Down beneath a shady willow, 144
Down by a Shady grove one day I chanced to rove, 141
Down in the meadows the violets so blue, 74
Duke of Berwick's March, The, 34
Enjoyment, The, 106
Faithful Lovers, 46
Fields were green the hills were gay, The, 44
Four and twentieth day of May, The, 102
Frigate, The, 128
Gages Lamentation, 130
Gentle sailor, oft you've told me, 136
Golden Glove, The, 107
Hayrakers, The, 94
How hard is the fate of all woman kind, 134
How little do our parents know, 116
How stands the Glass Around, 34
How stands the glass around, for which we take no care my bo, 34
Husband's Complaint, The, 54
I wish the wars were all Over, 74
In Falmouth lived a Merchant Tailor, 52
In Woodstock Town in Oxford shore, 72
It was of bold Capt. Strawhon in the Experiment, 56
It was on a summers morning the 14th day of May, 48
It was on Witson wednesday the day appointed was, 30
It's of a fair damsel both charming and young, 76
Ladies Case, The, 134
Last Whitsunday morning to Tobby I was wed, 26
Love and Wine, 122
Love Has Brought me to Despair, 72
Low Down in the Broom, 30
Maiden Lamentation in Bedlam, The, 132
Maiden's Lamentation, The, 48, 112
Maiden's Lamentation for the loss of her Love, The, 144
Man of War Song, A, 146
Mariners of Britain, The, 32
Miller of Dee, The, 140
Molly's Lamentation for the loss of her William, 78
Nancy of Yarmouth, 65
New England, New England I'd have you give here, 130
New Liberty Song, A, 120
Now our ship is arrived, 146
Now the winter it is come and the Summer's past and gone, 78

-163-

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A Sailor's Songbag: An American Rebel in an English Prison, 1777-1779
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • The Songs 23
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 163
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