Jig Cook and the Provincetown Players: Theatre in Ferment

By Robert Karoly Sarlos | Go to book overview

7
The Dome

"Nothing there but infinity and the stage,
George Cram Cook's notes cited by Susan Glaspell,

THE ROAD TO THE TEMPLE

"If we went uptown, we expanded, and we've headed ever since for the rocks."
Edna Kenton, to Cook and Glaspell, July 14, 1922

1 The last phase of the Provincetown Players' productive ferment began with an excitement very much like one that inspired the collective's move to New York. In the summer of 1916, the decision to establish a theatre in Greenwich Village was largely prompted by the discovery of a young playwright, Eugene O'Neill, who seemed to grow out of, and thrive in, the fertile soil of collective creativity imbued with a Dionysian spirit. Four seasons of experimentation, in the course of which twelve short plays of his were produced by the group, afforded him "prolonged preliminary freedom with stage and audience" 1 at The Playwright's Theatre. As a result the dramatist had been recognized as America's most talented even before Beyond the Horizon was produced on Broadway and won the Pulitzer Prize, edging out James Forbes's The Famous Mrs. Fair. In the summer of 1920, Jig Cook was again intent on kindling heavenly fire in the entire—and by this time, fragmented—collective. He was under the spell of a new kind of play O'Neill was writing, one that probed the Jungian unconscious of Western man and appeared to demand a vision of pure space on the tiny stage.

As the wharf remains a symbol of "that great Provincetown summer," 2 of the productive blending of disparate creative talents and energies, and of the first (and formative) spontaneous spurt of the group's accomplishments, so the dome represents the collective's second (and ultimately destructive) artistic eruption. As the former resulted in stimulating recognition, so the

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jig Cook and the Provincetown Players: Theatre in Ferment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Initroduction: Renascence and Innocence 1
  • 2 - The Wharf 9
  • 3 - Jig Cook: Dionysos in 1915 34
  • 4 - From Cape Cod to Greenwich Village 60
  • 5 - Growth and Consequences 75
  • 6 - The Young Turks 104
  • 7 - The Dome 123
  • 8 - From Republic to Triumvirate 138
  • 9 - Conclusions: The Provincetown Perspective 153
  • Appendix A - Chronology 169
  • Appendix B - Dramatis Personae: an Annotated Who Was Who 181
  • Appendix C - Physical Structures 200
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.